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My goal is to list to STDOUT the class files and .jar files being executed by java on a Linux server. I could do some getopts thing to get args to -jar, but other processes identified by

ps -ef | grep java or ps -eo args | grep java

might be executing a class file, e.g. java -classpath /a/b/c myclass A1 A2 . I am concerned that I am looking at an inelegant solution full of lengthy piplines of greps and awk's to solve what should be (I think) a straightforward query. Given that:

  1. some calls are made to just 'java' and others to the fully qualified pathname for java,

  2. a variety of different (or no) java options may be set on the command line for running a process,

  3. some processes call .jar files, some call .class files, and

  4. there may be args to the class,

what is the best way to get a simple list of running java executables, like:

abc.jar

mymainclass

xyz.jar

numainclass

I think that this may be a not uncommon question, but I can't seem to build a search string that locates any previous discussion here. An elegant solution would be nice; right now I am looking at grepping '-jar' entries to a getops call, and parsing the remainder considering all possible combinations. I am working on a solution in bash 3.x

Thanks!

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You can use JVisualVM that comes with JDK http://visualvm.java.net/description.html. But, you need to set up JMX support in your app see Enabling JMX access in the target VM section in the given link –  eee Nov 23 '11 at 23:15
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The jps command introduced in jdk5 might be what you are looking for. Using the -l and -m options it will output the pid main class and arguments. Adding -v will add the vm arguments.

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We actually ended up writing a bash parser, but if we had not done so, this would have been out solution of choice. Thanks Jorn. –  cvsdave Jan 16 '13 at 13:38
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How about just put all the items you do need to look for on a regular basis in a file say lookjava.txt and run this one liner

for i in `cat lookjava.txt`; do ps -ef | grep ${i}; done
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This option lists all Java files currently opened by a java command. Maybe it is useful to you.

lsof | grep -E "^java.*(.jar|.class)$" | sed -E "s/\s+/\t/g" | cut -f9

It works in Debian.

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