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I have a friends table: id, fid1, fid2 which represents a friendship between two users (bidirectional).

and a users table: fid,name

I'd like to make a function or query that takes

  1. User id

and returns

  1. list of friends (users.fid, users.name) which represent all of the friends which are friends with original user id

I'm having trouble with nesting JOINs and UNIONs. I need the UNION to make sure that I get all friendships (but also don't get duplicates). This is what I've got so far:

SELECT fid1 as friends FROM friendships WHERE fid2 = 123456
INNER JOIN users
ON friendships.fid1 = users.fid

UNION ALL (

SELECT fid2 as friends FROM friendships WHERE fid1 = 123456
INNER JOIN users
ON friendships.fid2 = users.fid
)

which is an error:

#1064 - You have an error in your SQL syntax; check the manual that corresponds to your MySQL server version for the right syntax to use near 'INNER JOIN users ON friendships.fid1 = users.fid UNION ALL ( SELECT fid2' at line 2

in general I'm having trouble with commands because I don't understand how SQL treats results - in normal programming languages I'd pass the result of the INNER JOINs to the UNIONs and then apply that function. But I'm getting a bit lost here. Any thoughts?

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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your WHERE needs to go after the JOIN

SELECT f.fid1 AS friends
FROM friendships AS f
INNER JOIN users AS u ON f.fid1 = u.fid
WHERE f.fid2 = 123456

UNION ALL

SELECT f.fid2 AS friends
FROM friendships AS f
INNER JOIN users AS u ON f.fid2 = u.fid
WHERE f.fid1 = 123456

Visual article on Joins

Information on MySQL SELECT syntax

As you can see from the SELECT syntax, you join all of your tables together, then apply the filters (WHERE clauses). This creates one result set. You can then UNION that to another result set of the same format (Same number of columns, same data types).

A UNION will return all distinct records, and a UNION ALL will return the first record set, then the second record set, maintaining order.

Option 2

SELECT CASE
          WHEN t.fid1 != 1 THEN t.fid1
          ELSE t.fid2
       END AS Friends
FROM
(
   SELECT DISTINCT f.fid1, f.fid2
   FROM friendships AS f
   LEFT JOIN users AS u ON f.fid2 = u.fid
   WHERE f.fid1 = 1 OR f.fid2 = 1
) AS t

Option 3

SELECT DISTINCT
   TRIM(CASE
           WHEN f.fid1 = 1 THEN ' '
           ELSE f.fid1
        END +
   CASE
      WHEN f.fid2 = 1 THEN ' '
      ELSE f.fid2
   END) AS Friends
FROM friendships AS f
LEFT JOIN users AS u ON f.fid2 = u.fid
WHERE f.fid1 = 1 OR f.fid2 = 1

I am not sure which will perform better for you, may want to test it out under your real-world conditions, mine showed all three performed similarly, but I have very little data, and no indexes for my testing.

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thanks! that did it. is this the most efficient way to do it? –  lollercoaster Nov 23 '11 at 22:46
    
@lollercoaster I'm thinking about that now. Initially I do not believe so, but I wanted to address your questions about JOIN and UNION syntax. Hopefully I'll come up with something better here quickly –  Adam Wenger Nov 23 '11 at 22:50
    
@lollercoaster I have added some additional options to my answer. I do not know which is faster for your system (Testing on SQL Server 2012 CTP3) It may come down to personal preference on coding style for you if the performance is similar, at which point I think I like them in order, 1, 2, 3 in terms of readability. –  Adam Wenger Nov 23 '11 at 23:17
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