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i want to find out the type of a Variable (the variable is given by a Template parameter, so I don't know what it is).

#include <iostream>
#include <typeinfo>

int main() 
{
    double test;
    std::cout << typeid(test).name() << std::endl;
}

But the Code only emits: $./test

d

but I would need double instead.

The point is, I don't know which type to expect, but I have to write it in a subprogram, which hast to be compiled. So d is a bad idea.

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1  
If it's a template parameter, isn't that parameter the type itself?! –  Shahbaz Nov 23 '11 at 22:36
3  
There is no standard way to do what you want. The name representation is implementation defined, and IIRC the implementation is allowed not to provide a representation at all. All that was in the case of polymorphic types only, good luck with non-polymorphic types. –  AraK Nov 23 '11 at 22:36
3  
My guess is that you want to do something that you haven't explained. Why do you need the type name? I'm pretty sure there is a way to solve your actual problem, rather than the one you have asked. –  drdwilcox Nov 23 '11 at 22:41
1  
You should really use a example that demonstrates your problem. In the current example there aren't any template parameters, so the main problems you want solved is not explained by the example... –  sth Nov 23 '11 at 22:44
1  
@AraK: Looking at 5.2.8/3 in my draft C++0x Standard, it looks like you are supposed to get a std::type_info object for non-polymorphic types also. Of course, not all compilers implement every detail of the Standard yet, and name() returns something implemention-defined. –  David Thornley Nov 23 '11 at 22:52
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4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

In GNU ABI, there is a helper to demangle the name() of a typeid

Disclaimer In case it wasn't obvious, of course the GNU ABI only supports demangling names from the GNU ABI (and probably not even wildly varying versions).

#include <cxxabi.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string>

template <typename T> std::string nameofType(const T& v)
{
    int     status;
    char   *realname = abi::__cxa_demangle(typeid(v).name(), 0, 0, &status);
    std::string name(realname? realname : "????");
    free(realname);

    return name;
}
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There, now in nifty c++ wrapper function. For my own reference, at least! –  sehe Nov 23 '11 at 23:23
1  
Do add the fact that it's not portable to description. –  thekashyap Nov 23 '11 at 23:30
    
@thekashyap Well, it is portable as far as the GNU ABI is portable (2nd and 3rd words, all caps; hard to miss). It just won't work under a zillion other compilers. Ok, Will add a little bit stronger wording then. –  sehe Nov 24 '11 at 0:05
    
This looks like an answer that could be infrequently pasted in future similar questions :-) (By the way, did you mean std::free?) –  Kerrek SB Nov 24 '11 at 0:43
    
@KerrekSB: weehoo, I have had much confusion with that (presumably older versions of GNU glibc/libstdc++ not doing things correctly. Just verified that I can, now-adays, use std::* (however, including <cstdlib> did define ::free without prompting). Anyways, fixed the sample the other way around, no need confusing people with c++0x that isn't required here :) –  sehe Nov 24 '11 at 0:49
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If you know the list of types that must be supported, you can write your own function to do this:

template <typename T>
void printtype()
{
  if (typeid(T) == typeid(double))
    std::cout << "double";
  else if (typeid(T) == typeid(int))
    std::cout << "int";
}

Notice that since the function doesn't have an argument of type T, it must always have the type explicitly stated:

printtype<double>()

and of course, the type could be a parameter type:

printtype<U>()
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Working, but I don't know the types. I know they will be composed of double, int and floats, but it could be any struct. –  cl_progger Nov 24 '11 at 16:21
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Note: The string returned by member name of type_info depends on the specific implementation of your compiler and library. It is not necessarily a simple string with its typical type name, like in the compiler used to produce this output.

What our compiler returned in the calls type_info::name in the this example, our compiler generated names that are easily understandable by humans, but this is not a requirement: a compiler may just return any string.

Source: http://www.cplusplus.com/doc/tutorial/typecasting/

My GCC produces mangled names. E.g. d for double, i for int, c for char and St6vectorIiSaIiEE for std::vector<int>

From GCC's typeinfo:

/** Returns an @e implementation-defined byte string; this is not
 *  portable between compilers!  */
const char* name() const
{ return __name[0] == '*' ? __name + 1 : __name; }

--edit--

You can not "repeatably" get the name across compilers. If you want to do exactly that you must hardcode a bit like John Gorden describes in his post.

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Do I have to use a special compiler flag in gcc? error: ‘__name’ was not declared in this scope –  cl_progger Nov 23 '11 at 22:57
1  
In GGG you can demangle names using a compiler extension. –  Kerrek SB Nov 23 '11 at 23:16
1  
@cl_progger I quoted that stuff from typeinfo header to highlight phrases "implementation-defined" and "not portable". __name is implementation of typeinfo. Don't try to use it. –  thekashyap Nov 23 '11 at 23:20
    
@KerrekSB good to know. Though not portable, it could be handy for some debugging. –  thekashyap Nov 23 '11 at 23:28
1  
@KerrekSB Yeah.. he did mention something abt passing this info to some opencl or something, but I guess he got his answer ("not possible portably") so he has left the building.. :) I personally don't see any other use than debugging your own template code. –  thekashyap Nov 23 '11 at 23:33
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You can try to force an error in a template with that expression as an argument, and the compiler error message will have the type you seek.

For example, using GCC:

#include <map>
#include <string>

template<typename T> void ErrorType(T &t)
{
    char x[sizeof(t)==0 ? 1 : -1];
}
template<typename T> void ErrorType(const T &t)
{
    char x[sizeof(t)==0 ? 1 : -1];
}

int main()
{
    double d = 3;
    const double cd = 3;
    ErrorType(d);
    ErrorType(cd);
    ErrorType(3);

    std::map<std::string, int> x;
    ErrorType(x.begin());
}

$ g++ -c test.cpp

test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(T&) [with T = double]’:
test.cpp:17:20:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:6:14: error: size of array is negative
test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(const T&) [with T = double]’:
test.cpp:18:21:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:10:14: error: size of array is negative
test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(const T&) [with T = int]’:
test.cpp:19:20:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:10:14: error: size of array is negative
test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(const T&) [with T = std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<const std::basic_string<char>, int> >]’:
test.cpp:22:28:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:10:14: error: size of array is negative

So the types dumped are double, int and std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<const std::basic_string<char>, int> >. The first overload is non-const, which means that the expression is a non-const l-value.

The trick of sizeof(t)==0 is needed to make the whole expression dependent on the template parameter, and delay the error until instantiation. The error itself (size of array is negative) is, of course, meaningless.

And if you are using C++11, you can improve:

#include <map>
#include <string>

template<typename T> void ErrorType(T &&t)
{
    static_assert(sizeof(t)==0, "Reporting type name");
}



int main()
{
    double d = 3;
    const double cd = 3;
    ErrorType(d);
    ErrorType(cd);
    ErrorType(3);

    std::map<std::string, int> x;
    ErrorType(x.begin());
}

$ g++ -c test.cpp  -std=gnu++0x


test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(T&&) [with T = double&]’:
test.cpp:15:20:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:6:9: error: static assertion failed: "Reporting type name"
test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(T&&) [with T = const double&]’:
test.cpp:16:21:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:6:9: error: static assertion failed: "Reporting type name"
test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(T&&) [with T = int]’:
test.cpp:17:20:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:6:9: error: static assertion failed: "Reporting type name"
test.cpp: In function ‘void ErrorType(T&&) [with T = std::_Rb_tree_iterator<std::pair<const std::basic_string<char>, int> >]’:
test.cpp:20:28:   instantiated from here
test.cpp:6:9: error: static assertion failed: "Reporting type name"

As an extra bonus, that can make a difference between const l-values and r-values. The first is a double l-value, the second a const double l-value and the other two are r-values.

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good idea :-), but impractical in my context –  cl_progger Nov 24 '11 at 16:21
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