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This question already has an answer here:

I think this must be easy but I do not get it.

Assume I have the following arparse parser:

import argparse

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser( version='pyargparsetest 1.0' )
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(help='commands')

# all
all_parser = subparsers.add_parser('all', help='process all apps')

# app
app_parser = subparsers.add_parser('app', help='process a single app')
app_parser.add_argument('appname', action='store', help='name of app to process')

How can I identify, which subparser was used? calling:

print parser.parse_args(["all"])

gives me an empty namespace:

Namespace()
share|improve this question

marked as duplicate by Gerald Kaszuba, tiago, Sindre Sorhus, Taryn East, Antti Haapala Aug 6 '13 at 1:27

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

    
This question IMHO has better answer then the one considered original. – Eugene Sajine Feb 26 '14 at 19:34
up vote 43 down vote accepted

Edit: Please see quornian's answer to this question, which is better than mine and should be the accepted answer.

According to the argparse documentation the result of parser.parseargs(...) will "only contain attributes for the main parser and the sub parser that was selected". Unfortunately this may not be enough information to determine which sub parser was used. The documentation recommends using the set_defaults(...) method on the sub parser to solve this problem.

For example, I've added calls to set_defaults() to your code:

import argparse

parser = argparse.ArgumentParser( version='pyargparsetest 1.0' )
subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(help='commands')

# all
all_parser = subparsers.add_parser('all', help='process all apps')
all_parser.set_defaults(which='all')

# app
app_parser = subparsers.add_parser('app', help='process a single app')
app_parser.add_argument('appname', action='store', help='name of app to process')
app_parser.set_defaults(which='app')

Now if you run

print parser.parse_args(["all"])

The result is

Namespace(which='all')

Check out the add_subparsers() documentation for more information and another example.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Nice answer. I don't know about set_defaults. – Raymond Hettinger Nov 23 '11 at 23:16
    
great, thanks. Thats exactly what I was looking for. – user1062880 Nov 24 '11 at 19:38
4  
set_defaults is useful, like in the docs' example where it uses it to bind a sub-command to a function.. but add_parser(dest='which') appears to be the "correct" way to do this, as it doesn't require repeating the subcommand name – dbr Jun 6 '12 at 12:02
    
@dbr Yep, you're right. Quornian's answer should be the accepted one. – srgerg Jun 7 '12 at 0:23

A simpler solution is to add dest to the add_subparsers call. This is buried a bit further down in the documentation:

[...] If it is necessary to check the name of the subparser that was invoked, the dest keyword argument to the add_subparsers() call will work

In your example replace:

subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(help='commands')

with:

subparsers = parser.add_subparsers(help='commands', dest='command')

Now if you run:

print parser.parse_args(["all"])

you will get

Namespace(command='all')
share|improve this answer
    
This seems like the correct way, as it works like the dest param on any other argument (only it defaults to None, rather than being pulled from the --longopt value). Using set_defaults seems inappropriate for this (but useful for other things) – dbr Jun 6 '12 at 12:01
    
This is the correct answer! Would be nice to have an example how to test the "command" value. – Eugene Sajine Feb 26 '14 at 19:16
    
BTW if there is function in the same class by the name of the command one could do: "getattr(self, args.command)()" to execute it by name! – Eugene Sajine Feb 26 '14 at 19:32
    
They should add this in a more obvious place in the docs. Very useful / appropriate solution – Bill Gross Apr 8 at 14:36

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