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I'm writing many unit tests in VS 2010 with Microsoft Test. In each test class I have many test methods similar to below:

[TestMethod]
public void This_is_a_Test()
{
  try
  {
    // do some test here
    // assert
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    // test failed, log error message in my log file and make the test fail
  }
  finally
  {
    // do some cleanup with different parameters
  }
}

When each test method looks like this I fell it's kind of ugly. But so far I haven't found a good solution to make my test code more clean, especially the cleanup code in the finally block. Could someone here give me some advices on this?

Thanks in advance.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you really want to handle and log exceptions whilst test execution you can wrap up this standard template in a helper method and use like shown below [*].

But if exceptions is a part of test case this is wrong approach and you should use facilities provided by a test framework, for instance NUnit provides such helpers to test exceptions:

Assert.Throws<ExceptionType>(() => { ... code block... });
Assert.DoesNotThrow(() => { ... code block... });

And to do cleanup special method attributes like [TestCleanup] and [TestInitialize] to do test initialization and cleanup automatically by a test framework.

[*] The idea is to wrap test body in a delegate and pass into the helper which actually perform test execution wrapped in the try/catch block:

// helper
public void ExecuteTest(Action test)
{
  try
  {
     test.Invoke();
  }
  catch (Exception ex)
  {
    // test failed, log error message in my log file and make the test fail
  }
  finally
  {
    // do some cleanup with different parameters
  }
}

[TestMethod]
public void This_is_a_Test_1()
{
   Action test = () =>
   {
       // test case logic
       // asserts
   };

   this.ExecuteTest(test);
}
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Thanks for the answer, I will give the solution a try. –  Bruce Li Nov 24 '11 at 10:39

Clear all try-catch-finally (especially catch is not only unnecessary, but even harmful, you should not catch exception when testing) and do the cleanup in tearDown method (however is it done in MS Test, I would presume there will be something like [TearDownMethod] or [FixtureTearDown] or something like that).

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I need finally block to do cleanups at least because each test method has something different to clean. –  Bruce Li Nov 24 '11 at 10:38
    
It that case, yes. If you need the cleaning at all. Tests run in separation. And if you cleverly separate them into fixtures, where you do common setup and common cleaning, you rarely need this pattern. I tell you from my experience. Can you give me an example of what you need to clean? (and I hope you understand that exceptions are not designed to be caught are logged by hand, but they are designed to be left to test runner to catch them and to see if it is a failure or an error, so the catch parts were really against the way how unit-testing is meant to be). –  herby Nov 24 '11 at 11:06
    
In catch block I want to log the error messages in a central place I defined for review. In finally block I need to clean some dynamically generated data in database. Only a few data are common for some test methods. –  Bruce Li Nov 24 '11 at 11:58
    
Logging done this way is bad in principle. Your test should lay out a scenario and test its functionality (driving you to create functional code). If you put logging there, you violate "separate domain from presentation" applied to test-running. You should use command-line test runner or devise some hooks to existing runner (there definitely are possibilities for that) and keeping tests clean from non-testing code. –  herby Nov 24 '11 at 12:08
    
As for database, isn't it possible to start transaction in setUp and rollback in tearDown (this is definitely common for all tests and works, and is way more robust)? –  herby Nov 24 '11 at 12:09

Have you considered using the ExpectedException attribute on the test method? http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.visualstudio.testtools.unittesting.expectedexceptionattribute.aspx

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