Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I have a double which has actual value (as seen from the debugger) val = 1.5530000000000002

however if I print it like string.Format("{0}", val) I get "1.553" which is realistic value I am looking for.

the 1.5530000000000002 comes from some socket API and I cant change that. But I need 1.553..

what shall I do?

Please note I receive thousands of these per sec. I can't afford tinkering with the Math class or converting them forth and back. any consolations?

share|improve this question
    
How do you receive these? Are they strings, 8-byte floating point values, or something else? – Gabe Nov 23 '11 at 23:55
    
Out of curiosity, why does it need to be exactly 1.553? Usually the imprecision is negligible, as long as you're not doing a lot of repeated computations where the errors can accumulate. – Dan Bryant Nov 24 '11 at 0:22
2  
FYI, in double precision, 1.553 == 1.55299999999999993605115378159. The next available number (I believe) is 1.553000000000009928058375408. So, to be fair, the number you're receiving actually isn't 1.553 (even within double precision), but it's pretty close. – Dan Bryant Nov 24 '11 at 0:31
    
@all.. The number is 1.553 because I know it is. I need it because I have Dictionary with Key on it. The actual question was - why Format makes it right? – Boppity Bop Nov 24 '11 at 13:30
    
@gabe if i had strings from socket i wont be asking. – Boppity Bop Nov 24 '11 at 13:39

The problem is that double is a floating-point value, and it might be IMPOSSIBLE for it to hold exactly 1.5530000000000000. The decimal type is better for holding an exact value like this.

If you cannot change double to decimal in the socket API, then you have no choice but to use math to fix this issue. In that case, you will need to convert the double to a decimal, then perform the math to adjust for the accuracy you desire.

Here's how you can easily do that:

double value = 1.5530000000000002;
decimal rounded = decimal.Round((decimal)value, 3);
share|improve this answer
2  
This is the proper answer. If you use double you can't really count on its precision. If you want precision use decimal. – mozillanerd Nov 24 '11 at 0:03
    
I can and I have. – Boppity Bop Nov 24 '11 at 13:38

The Math class is more than capable of doing thousands of those per second. So all you need to do is Math.Floor(val, 3) or Math.Round(val, 3).

share|improve this answer
    
wrong. try and measure. Math has like 1000% overhead – Boppity Bop Nov 24 '11 at 13:27
    
@Bobb: Try measuring using sockets. There is no way you receive information faster than you can round something down. – Ryan O'Hara Nov 24 '11 at 15:10
    
of course you can receive faster. data is flowing non stop. delays in sockets irrelevant - although data was sent 200ms ago it still is flowing in abundance. plus there is not just one socket... so please dont argue. the question was - how to NOT use Math. thanks – Boppity Bop Nov 25 '11 at 7:18
    
@Bobb: Okay, well, if you want my benchmarks, here they are. 10,000 iterations. Math.Round takes 1 millisecond, CSng takes 1 millisecond, and doing nothing at all takes 0.8 milliseconds, at least on my computer. And you're not doing nothing. – Ryan O'Hara Nov 25 '11 at 14:58
    
Okay. I dont know hot to get to the chat from this website - let me know I will give you the code. I tested 50K Math.Round vs multiplying and casting to int.... Math takes 12K ticks on average, int takes 700 ticks which is 1700% faster. Wanna bet? – Boppity Bop Nov 25 '11 at 19:59

Fundamentally, then, you need to be using a decimal data type, not double. Decimal can store exact values, with the scope of it's precision; double cannot, hence the observed behaviour.

share|improve this answer
1  
fundamentally Steve I need a big pension account and 360 days holiday on Cuba... but yeah. need to deal with pesky doubles. – Boppity Bop Nov 24 '11 at 13:29

Do you have to use Double? If not you could use Decimal.Round(val, 3), for example.

share|improve this answer
2  
@Bobb: Based on the questions I have seen on this site, I never make any assumptions about what someone knows or doesn't know. Even if you knew it, you might have been so focused on solving it one way that you forgot about alternate approaches. I have done this many, many times in my career and sometimes it takes someone mentioning something that might otherwise seem obvious to get me back on path. I was just trying to be helpful. Thank you. – competent_tech Nov 24 '11 at 18:07
up vote 0 down vote accepted

I decided to upscale them to ints. I can do it because I know how many significant digits are in the number.

int real = (int)(dbl * multiplier);

I am sure decimals will be slower simply because I dont have x128 CPU and memory bus. Using Math is out questions ever.

sorry for the blur with casting to float earlier.

EDIT OK. So I got that SO now is not free anymore. Each question need now attention which is costly in time... Here is the code which answers why I will not use Decimals and Math.

class Program
{
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        Start();
        Console.ReadLine();                
    }

    static int TESTS = 10;
    static int LOOPS = 50000;

    static double d1 = 1.5530000000000002;
    static double d2 = 1.5531;

    static double dResult;
    static int iResult;
    static decimal cResult;

    static void Start()
    {
        // actual test
        for (int x = 0; x < TESTS; x++)
        {
            Stopwatch sw = new Stopwatch();

            long tick1, tick2, tick3;
            sw.Start();
            for (int j = 0; j < LOOPS; j++)
            {
                dResult = Math.Round(d1 / 2.0, 4);
                dResult = Math.Round(d2 / 2.0, 4);
            }
            sw.Stop();

            tick1 = sw.ElapsedTicks;

            sw.Restart();
            for (int j = 0; j < LOOPS; j++)
            {
                iResult = (int)(d1 / 2.0 * 10000.0);
                iResult = (int)(d2 / 2.0 * 10000.0);
            }
            sw.Stop();

            tick2 = sw.ElapsedTicks;

            sw.Restart();
            for (int j = 0; j < LOOPS; j++)
            {
                cResult = decimal.Round((decimal)d1, 4);
                cResult = decimal.Round((decimal)d2, 4);
            }
            sw.Stop();

            tick3 = sw.ElapsedTicks;

            Console.WriteLine("Math {0} Int {1} Decimal {2}", tick1, tick2, tick3);
        }
    }
}

first part - is Math, second is what I am intended to use (conversion to int), and the third is Decimals.

The results on my i7 as follows - 12K ticks, 700 ticks, 35K ticks respectively.

share|improve this answer
2  
You are aware that you can't express 1.553 as a float either, right? It's actually something like 1.55299997. – Gabe Nov 24 '11 at 17:45
    
@Gabe His point is that it's fastest to use int scaled by 10000. @Bobb: You repeatedly state that you CANNOT use math, and then you answer by using multiplication? I regret entering this discussion. – Scott Rippey Nov 28 '11 at 19:10
1  
@Scott: When I wrote my comment, Bobb's answer was that he could just convert to a float. Note that he said that he cannot use Math (the BCL class); presumably math (arithmetic) is OK. – Gabe Nov 28 '11 at 19:35
    
@Gabe Oh, I hate when edits invalidate comments. – Scott Rippey Nov 28 '11 at 19:54

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.