Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to make a webpage change the background color every one second using JavaScript. I'm using setTimeout but I can't figure out how to get my variable to change in the function. Here's my code:

 <!DOCTYPE html>
 <html>
     <head>
         <script type="text/javascript">
         function changecolors() {
             x = 1; // <-- I know this is wrong, I just don't know where to place it 
             var t = setTimeout("change()", 1000);
         }
         function change() {
             while(x < 3) {
                 if(x = 1) {
                     color = "red";
                     x++;
                 } else if (x = 2) {
                     color = "green";
                     x = 1;
                 }
                 document.body.style.background = color;
             }
         }
     </head>
     <body onload="changecolors()">
     </body>
 </html>
share|improve this question
    
bring back blink! :P –  Russell Nov 23 '11 at 23:45
    
is change() supposed to call changecolors() to setup the next call again, or is it being called from somewhere else?? otherwise its only going to happen once –  Nadir Muzaffar Nov 23 '11 at 23:48
2  
There are quite a few things wrong on your code: (a) Your variables leak into global scope. (b) You have an infinite loop (x will always be smaller 3). (c) You are assigning instead of comparing. (d) You call the function only once after one second, not every seconds. –  Felix Kling Nov 23 '11 at 23:54
    
This is not the actual code this is just a mok up i made to show what i was trying to do. –  Justin Yoder Nov 24 '11 at 0:22
    
@Russel thanks much for this answer! Upped! –  Dmitry Lambrianov Jan 24 at 10:36

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

There are several problems here. I’ll just fix your code:

var x;

function changecolors() {
    x = 1;
    setInterval(change, 1000);
}

function change() {
    if (x === 1) {
        color = "red";
        x = 2;
    } else {
        color = "green";
        x = 1;
    }

    document.body.style.background = color;
}

Basically...

  • You need setInterval instead of setTimeout. setTimeout only executes once.
  • = assigns, even in an if statement. You need == (or better, ===).
  • You shouldn't pass a string to setTimeout or setInterval. Instead, pass a function.

Another point of note: you shouldn’t use the on* attributes of HTML elements for event listeners, but especially not on <body>, since you can do this in JavaScript instead, and be unobtrusive:

window.onload = changecolors;

Of course, you could do it with fewer functions and no pollution of the global namespace.

share|improve this answer
    
this is the best answer (i upped it), but i'm curious, why do you say not to use the on**** attributes in html. i generally use jquery to bind events, but sometimes i use onclick or onmouseover. what's the problem with those? –  Landon Nov 23 '11 at 23:59
1  
@Landon: It's not that they're wrong, but in big projects it's generally a lot easier to understand when all of the JavaScript, CSS, and HTML are separate. When you mix JavaScript and HTML like that, it can become confusing. Of course, if you're testing, only have access to one file, or are doing a small personal project, it's not too bad. –  minitech Nov 24 '11 at 0:01
    
Thank you very much. You were very straight to the point and explained why you changed the things you did. Very informative. –  Justin Yoder Nov 24 '11 at 0:31

Blink fiddle:

http://jsfiddle.net/GolezTrol/R4c5P/1/

Uses this function:

function initBlink()
{
    var state = false;
    setInterval(function()
        {
            state = !state;
            var color = (state?'red':'green');
            document.getElementById('test').style.color = color;
        }, 1000);
}

Uses closure to keep the state out of the global scope. Uses setInterval instead of setTimeout for repeated calling, although that may not be convenient. Both setInterval and setTimeout return a handle you can save and use to stop the timer, if you want, but since you didn't ask about that, I left it out for simplicity.

The function just defines an anonymous callback that toggles a boolean and sets the color of a test div.

share|improve this answer

Also, consider doing it with CSS. Demo.

@-webkit-keyframes blink {
        0%   { background:red; }
        50%  { background:green;}
        100% { background:red; }
}
@-moz-keyframes blink {
        0%   { background:red; }
        50%  { background:green;}
        100% { background:red; }
}
@-ms-keyframes blink {
        0%   { background:red; }
        50%  { background:green;}
        100% { background:red; }
}
body{
     -webkit-animation: blink 1s infinite;
     -moz-animation:    blink 1s infinite;
     -ms-animation:     blink 1s infinite;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Now thats a creative approach, sadly it will work only on newest browsers. –  cps7 Nov 24 '11 at 0:35

x = 1; assigns x a value of 1, even in an if statement. Use x == 1 in if statements to keep the value of your variable unchanged.

share|improve this answer
    
Even with this fix it would not work as intended. –  Felix Kling Nov 23 '11 at 23:57

I would advice not to do this, since it might be pretty annoying, but this should work:

var x = false;
function changecolors(){
  var color=(x)?"green":"red"; // If X == true, then set to green, if false then blue
  document.body.style.background = color; // Set color
  x=!x; // Invert X
} 

And then in the body:

<body onload="setInterval(changecolors,1000)">

PS: Sorry if I'm not answering the question right...this code will change the background from blue to green every second repeatedly for an infinite amount of time. (What I mean is that I kinda redid your code rather than explaining what was wrong with yours...)

share|improve this answer

For one thing, this:

if (x = 1){

Should be this:

if(x == 1) {

Your statement sets x to 1, rather than tests it to see if it's 1.

share|improve this answer

You should definetly read some basic JavaScript tutorial or book. I am also new to JavaScript but some reading has helped. Here http://www.w3schools.com/js/ you can find some good stuff as reference.

This should do the trick

<!DOCTYPE html>
<html>
    <head>
        <script type="text/javascript">

            function change_color(flag){
                var color = null;
                if (flag === true){
                    var color = "red";
                }else{
                    var color = "green";
                }
                document.body.style.background = color;
                flag = !flag
                var t=setTimeout(function(){change_color(flag)},1000);
            }
        </script>
    </head>

    <body onload="change_color(true)">
</body>

If you are going to manipulate the DOM a lot i recommend JQuery

share|improve this answer

If you expect the browser to support CSS animations, you can so something more interesting and perhaps less annoying. Define in your style sheet:

body {
    -webkit-animation: changebg 1s infinite cubic-bezier(1,0,0,1);
       -moz-animation: changebg 1s infinite cubic-bezier(1,0,0,1);
            animation: changebg 1s infinite cubic-bezier(1,0,0,1);
}

@-moz-keyframes changebg {
      0% {background-color: #f00;}
     50% {background-color: #fff;}
    100% {background-color: #f00;}
}

@-webkit-keyframes changebg {
      0% {background-color: #f00;}
     50% {background-color: #fff;}
    100% {background-color: #f00;}
}

@keyframes changebg {
      0% {background-color: #f00;}
     50% {background-color: #fff;}
    100% {background-color: #f00;}
}

And you're done, without JavaScript at all. Unfortunately, CSS animations are not standard yet, so those hinge on prefixes, hence I had to repeat for -moz- and -webkit-. It doesnt work on Opera and IE, for now.

share|improve this answer
1  
2012 note: (not tested) Opera now supports CSS3 Animations. It briefly needed to be prefixed in Op 12.0 and it's now unprefixed in Op 12.5 according to caniuse.com –  FelipeAls Aug 31 '12 at 1:13
    
@FelipeAlsacreations Thanks man, it had to be noted. –  MaxArt Aug 31 '12 at 7:18

Your code is missing the closing </script> tag and other issues mentioned above.

Find below a fix of your code that removes the global variable.

 <html> 
     <head> 
         <script type="text/javascript">
         function changecolors() {    
             var t = setInterval('change()',1000); 
         } 

         function change() {
             var color = document.body.style.background;

             if(color == "red") {
                 document.body.style.background = "green";
             } else {
                 document.body.style.background = "red";
             }
         } 
        </script>
     </head> 
     <body onload="javascript:changecolors()"> 
     </body> 
 </html>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.