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I've been exploring javascript more deeply lately, playing around with a node,redis,socket.io,express simple webapp.

I think I've come to a problem that is an example of the fundamental difference between JS and PHP, which is what I've been using the last few years.

I've written this callback and need to return a stack of data from redis

app.get('/deck', function(request, response) { 
  dealer.sort('cards', 'BY', 'deal:*->timestamp', 'GET', 'card:*->card_key',
    function(err, card_keys) {
      var deck = []; 
      for (k in card_keys) { 
        dealer.hget(card_keys[k], 'data', function(err, card_data) { 
          var deal = eval('(' + card_data +')');
          deals.push(cards);
        }); 
      }   
      response.json(deals);
    }   
  );  
});

Now first I thought it was a variable scoping problem so I rewrote with a closure (did I use this term correctly?) which didn't work because I am writing this in synchronous mind set. I realize that this is essentially synchronous and sends the data out before it is collected. The design is wrong.

I can rewrite the function to use socket.io's emit function to send data as it is collected.

But are there design patterns for handling synchronous data? What if I want to show the last 10 cards in order? Do I send the data over anyway and have client side code queue up 10, and trigger an event that sorts and then control display?

Edit: I found this question which essentially mine, except that I would like to figure out how to design this without relying an synchronous library.

share|improve this question
    
you can't use async function in your for loop. You should use something like async or streamlinejs. –  racar Nov 24 '11 at 0:53
    
Thanks, but for my own good, I would like to understand how to structure this in a callback way without relying on those libraries. –  jskulski Nov 24 '11 at 1:18
    
Check both link i posted, it should answer your question. –  racar Nov 24 '11 at 1:20
    
your k is leaking –  Ricardo Tomasi Nov 24 '11 at 8:05

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted
function(err, card_keys) {
    var deck = [];
    for (k in card_keys) {
        // whole bunch of async actions
        dealer.hget(card_keys[k], 'data', function(err, card_data) {
            var deal = eval('(' + card_data + ')');
            deals.push(cards);
        });
    }
    // sync action
    response.json(deals);
}

You already know response.json fires before the hget are done.

The answer is reference counting

function(err, card_keys) {
    var deck = [];
    var count = Object.keys(card_keys).length;

    function next() {
        if (--count === 0) {
            response.json(deals.sort(sortThem)); 
        }  
    }

    for (k in card_keys) {
        dealer.hget(card_keys[k], 'data', function(err, card_data) {
            var deal = JSON.parse(card_data);
            deals.push(cards);
            next();
        });
    }
}

You have two other minor problems

  • using eval instead of JSON.parse
  • your deals array is unordered because hget is asynchronous, so you need a sorting function.
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for pointing me to reference counting. –  racar Nov 24 '11 at 1:35
    
Thanks for the answer, trying to grok this all. One quick question, why Object.keys(card_keys).length instead of card_keys.length? –  jskulski Nov 24 '11 at 2:19
    
@jskulski wasn't sure if card_keys was an array. I mean you did use a for..in loop over it and for..in over an array is a bad practice –  Raynos Nov 24 '11 at 2:23
    
@Raynos well I'm very new at this :) Thanks for all the tips, appreciate it. –  jskulski Nov 24 '11 at 2:38

One way to achieve this without using another library is using the "recursive pattern".

You can't do some asynchronious call in a for loop.

card_keys need to be an array.

Some useful link about how to write for loop :

  1. http://tech.richardrodger.com/2011/04/21/node-js-%E2%80%93-how-to-write-a-for-loop-with-callbacks/
  2. http://metaduck.com/post/2675027550/asynchronous-iteration-patterns-in-node-js

EDIT: Like Raynos said, you should use reference counting instead.

I suggest you use a lib and do something like this with async:

...
var deals = []
async.forEach(card_keys, function(err, results) {
    if (err) {
        callback(err);
    } else {
        deals.push(results); // For each card
    }
}, function(err) {
    callback(deals); // When it's completed
});
...

This is how async is doing the forEach

async.forEach = function (arr, iterator, callback) {
    if (!arr.length) {
        return callback();
    }
    var completed = 0;
    _forEach(arr, function (x) {
        iterator(x, function (err) {
            if (err) {
                callback(err);
                callback = function () {};
            }
            else {
                completed += 1;
                if (completed === arr.length) {
                    callback();
                }
            }
        });
    });
};

Edit: Which one is faster : reference counting or recursive pattern

I did 100 basic query :

Resurcive pattern : 7161,7528, 7226 MS

Reference counting: 7515, 7256, 7364 MS

Recursive pattern code :

var req = "select id from membre";

var time = new Date().getTime();

var test = function(value,callback) {
   if(value < 100) {
      client.query(req, function(err, results) {
          test(++value,callback);
      });
   } else {
       callback();
   }
}

test(0, function() {
   var time2 = new Date().getTime();
   console.log(time2-time);
   client.end();
});

Reference counting code :

var req = "select id from membre";

var time = new Date().getTime();

var test = function(callback) {

   var c = 100;
   function next() {
      if(--c === 0) callback();
   }

  for(var i =0; i < c; i++) {
       client.query(req, function(err) {
          next();
       });
   }
};


test(function() {
   var time2 = new Date().getTime();
    console.log(t2-t);
   client.end();
});

Why it's almost the same time ? Since it's mysql we don't gain that much from the "async" from node-js in this situation. See comments.

share|improve this answer
    
"recursive pattern" is wrong, that's not asynchronous, that's waterfall and slow as hell. –  Raynos Nov 24 '11 at 1:20
    
Good point. I would not say slow as hell ... but reference counting is better, a lot –  racar Nov 24 '11 at 1:34
    
recursion means only one task is running at a time. This means zero parallelism which means slow as hell –  Raynos Nov 24 '11 at 1:37
    
1  
I see why your code doesn't go faster. It's because your using mysql and it's using a transaction. So even though the reference counting code sends 100 mysql requests in parallel, mysql only processes it one at a time. This is why we use a real database and it's a good example of how one piece of blocking code (mysql) becomes your entire application bottleneck –  Raynos Nov 24 '11 at 2:56

You aren't doing this properly since the server could respond before the db queries have returned their results.

You should instead use control flow libraries like Step or Async. Learn more about them on dailyjs.

I personally use Step, so here's show I would do it:

app.get('/deck', function(request, response) { 
  dealer.sort('cards', 'BY', 'deal:*->timestamp', 'GET', 'card:*->card_key',
    function(err, card_keys) {
      var deals = [], iterations = Object.keys(card_keys).length;
      // iterations contains the length of 'card_keys'
      Step(
        function queries() {
          var deck = [];
          if (!iterations) { this(null); return; } // if no cards
          for (k in card_keys) {
            dealer.hget(card_keys[k], 'data', function(err, card_data) {
              var deal;
              if (err) {
                throw new Error('Database error');
              } else {
                // we decrease the number of iterations until it gets to 0
                // and then we trigger the callback, since every query has
                // returned its result
                iterations--;
                deal = eval('(' + card_data +')');
                deals.push(cards);
                if (!iterations) { this(deals); } // callback function called
              }
            });
          }
        },
        function render(deals) {
          response.json(deals);
        }
      );
    }
  );
});
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