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So I am trying to run a NSTask in a background thread and display its output in a NSTextview that is on a NSPanel attached to my window ( Preference Pane ) using readInBackgroundAndNotify It does not seem like I am receiving the notifications as the method that should be called is not.

I have the controller class (PreferencePane.m) init the class (Inventory.m) that is in charge of running the NSTask

- (IBAction)updateInventoryButtonPressed:(id)sender
{
    inventory = [[Inventory alloc] init];
....

Then I send it a NSNotification to start the background (from PreferencePane.m):

....
[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]
 postNotificationName:NotificationInventoryRequested
 object:self];
}

This class (Inventory.m) is an observer of this constant (NotificationInventoryRequested) in its init override

 - (id)init
{   
        [super init];
        [[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self
                                             selector:@selector(inventoryRequested:) 
                                                 name:NotificationInventoryRequested    
                                               object:nil];
    return self;

}

This runs the inventoryRequested method (of Inventory.m)

-(void)inventoryRequested:(NSNotification*)aNotification
{
    if (inventoryIsRunning) {
        NSLog(@"Inventory is already running, ignoring request");
    }
    else {
        NSLog(@"Starting Inventory in background...");
        [NSThread detachNewThreadSelector:@selector(runInventoryTask)
                                 toTarget:self
                               withObject:nil];
}

}

This runs my NSTask method which I have refactored a few times from examples

Set a BOOL to help with duplicate runs sanity is handled by inventoryRequested using ivar inventoryIsRunning

    -(void)runInventoryTask
  {
    inventoryIsRunning = YES;
 ....

I double check my task and setup the readInBackgroundAndNotify adding my self as an observer.

 ....
if (task) {
NSLog(@"Found existing task...releasing");
    [task release];
}
task = [[NSTask alloc] init];
NSLog(@"Setting up pipe");
[task setStandardOutput: [NSPipe pipe]];
[task setStandardError: [task standardOutput]];
// Setup our arguments
[task setLaunchPath:@"/usr/bin/local/inventory"];
[task setArguments:[NSArray arrayWithObjects:@"--force",
                    nil]];
//Said to help with Xcode now showing logs
//[task setStandardInput:[NSPipe pipe]];

[self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(addLogText:)
                       withObject:@"Launching Task..."
                    waitUntilDone:false];

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
                                         selector:@selector(readPipe:) 
                                             name: NSFileHandleReadCompletionNotification 
                                           object: [[task standardOutput] fileHandleForReading]];

[[[task standardOutput] fileHandleForReading] readInBackgroundAndNotify];
[task launch];
[task waitUntilExit];
// Let Any Observers know we are finished with Inventory
[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]
 postNotificationName:NotificationInventoryComplete
 object:self];
inventoryIsRunning = NO;
}

This all seems to run fine. But this method never gets called (i.e. I don't see the window update or the NSLog in the console ):

-(void)readPipe:(NSNotification *)notification
{
NSData *data;
NSString *text;
NSLog(@"Read Pipe was called");

data = [[notification userInfo] 
        objectForKey:NSFileHandleNotificationDataItem];
if ([data length]){
    text = [[NSString alloc] initWithData:data 
                                 encoding:NSASCIIStringEncoding];
    // Update the text in our text view

    [self performSelectorOnMainThread:@selector(addLogText:)
                           withObject:text
                        waitUntilDone:false];
    NSLog(@"%@",text);
    [text release];

}
[[notification object] readInBackgroundAndNotify];


}

This all seems to run fine. But this method never gets called (i.e. I don't see the window update or the NSLog in the console ). I saw this thread and thought maybe it was my NSPanel blocking the run loop, so I set it as non-modal. I also remember reading about NSNotification's not being synchronous, so I thought perhaps because the method I is being called by a NSNotification, to test I just did this real quick:

- (IBAction)updateInventoryButtonPressed:(id)sender
{

inventory = [[Inventory alloc] init];

/*[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter]
 postNotificationName:NotificationInventoryRequested
 object:self];*/
[inventory inventoryRequested:self];
[self showPanel:sender];

Obviously self is not valid there, but it served to show me that even calling this method directly did not seem to help ( thus making me think this is not about NSNotification "blocking".)

Any thoughts on what I am missing, i have checked for removeObserver anywhere in my code ( I know I need to add it to dealloc and probably in readPipe: when the command run is done). If it helps here is the little NSTextview wrapper which needs work as I does not do line \n in the strings right now.

Inventory.h

//NSTextview
IBOutlet NSTextView  *      inventoryTextView;

Inventory.m

-(void)addLogText:(NSString *)text
{
NSRange myRange = NSMakeRange([[inventoryTextView textStorage] length], 0);
[[inventoryTextView textStorage] replaceCharactersInRange:myRange                                                          withString:text];
}

Any help with this would be appreciated too as its my next stumbling block.

UPDATED: Looks like this readData method is being called, however its not updating my Textview until the NSTask is complete,so I have a flow control problem.

share|improve this question
    
Shameless plug time! I wrote an entire replacement for (most of) NSTask so as not to deal with all that readInBackgroundAndNotify folderol ever again: bitbucket.org/boredzo/prhtask –  Peter Hosey Nov 24 '11 at 2:14
    
+1 because your question was so detailed it helped me solve a completely unrelated problem. –  Klox Oct 2 '13 at 16:22

3 Answers 3

[[NSNotificationCenter defaultCenter] addObserver:self 
                                         selector:@selector(readPipe:) 
                                             name: NSFileHandleReadCompletionNotification 
                                           object: [[task standardOutput] fileHandleForReading]];

[[[task standardOutput] fileHandleForReading] readInBackgroundAndNotify];

You're assuming that the pipe will return the same NSFileHandle object both times.

If it doesn't, then the object that posted the notification and the object you're observing for won't be the same object. That would explain why you're not seeing the notification, so I wouldn't count on that.

Try getting the NSFileHandle separately and assigning it to a variable, then using the variable in both the addObserver:selector:name:object: and readInBackgroundAndNotify message expressions.

[task waitUntilExit];

You're blocking your UI until the task is done. waitUntilExit should be considered harmful, for that reason at least, and probably others.

waitUntilExit uses the run loop, so I'm moderately surprised if the window isn't getting a chance to draw while it waits, but it's worth changing anyway, both as a potential fix (if indeed that is the problem) and because blocking the UI is bad in itself.

Consider observing for NSTaskDidTerminateNotification (which you should set up before you launch) instead. You can post your own notification when that notification arrives.

share|improve this answer
    
Well on closer inspection of the logs, it looks like it is being called, and the text eventually ends up in my textview, its just not doing until the Task is done, (which takes a while) thus my confusion . I actually had it coded as you describe initially but borrowed some code from the Moriority sample at Apple. Trying to figure out the blocking now. Anyones thoughts on the matter would be appreciated –  acidprime Nov 24 '11 at 4:05
    
@acidprime: I've edited my answer. –  Peter Hosey Nov 24 '11 at 7:42
    
Thanks for your help, I don't believe the waitUntilExit was an issue here as my NStask was running in its own thread, however I implemented the NSTaskDidTerminateNotification instead as it seems like a much better solution. –  acidprime Nov 26 '11 at 3:47
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I was able to get this working by adding the following

NSDictionary *defaultEnvironment = [[NSProcessInfo processInfo] environment];
NSMutableDictionary *environment = [[NSMutableDictionary alloc] initWithDictionary:defaultEnvironment];
[environment setObject:@"YES" forKey:@"NSUnbufferedIO"];
[task setEnvironment:environment];

This stopped the notification from only sending me the buffer ( all my output at once in my case ).

share|improve this answer
    
Brillant!!!! Thanks so much –  Bgi Jul 4 '13 at 17:04

According to the described blocking behaviour and the NSUnbufferedIO solution approach it seems to be a standard I/O stream buffering issue (that from time to time is rearing its ugly head in shell scripts as well).

For a quite detailed article on this tricky issue see: buffering in standard streams.

A way to avoid standard I/O stream buffering is to enable line buffering mode on part of the command line tool itself. Examples:

  • tcpdump -l
  • grep --line-buffered
  • sed -l

Line-buffered output mode can also often be enabled by running a command line tool in a pseudo terminal (pty) by using the script command.

/usr/bin/script -q /dev/null /usr/bin/local/inventory --force | ...

In addition to the Moriarity sample code from Apple there is further NSTasksample code that might be worth a look including AMShellWrapper, asynctask.m and PseudoTTY.app (listed at http://cocoadev.com/index.pl?NSTask).

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