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The stdio is usually buffered. When I hit a breakpoint and there's a printf before the breakpoint, the printed string may still be in the buffer and I can not see it.

I know I can flush the stdio by adding some flush code in the program. Without doing this, is there any way to tell GDB to flush the stdio of the program being debugged after GDB stops? This way is more friendly when debugging a program.

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+1: Interesting question. –  Oliver Charlesworth Nov 24 '11 at 1:33
    
It seems that GDB has no such mechanism. There are only workarounds. –  Yorkwar Nov 24 '11 at 4:10

3 Answers 3

Many recent UNIX stdio implementations will flush all buffers if you call fflush(NULL):

(gdb) call fflush(0)

But normally you shouldn't have to do that: if you called printf (and not fprintf), that goes stdout, which goes to your terminal, which would normally be line-buffered. So, so long as your printf printed a new line, the buffer would have been flushed after printf returned.

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The behaviour of fflush( NULL ) is well-defined as flushing all output streams. Any implementation not doing this is not standard-compliant. –  DevSolar Nov 15 '12 at 7:31
    
It works very well in my WinXP + MinGW + GDB, thanks. –  ollydbg23 Jun 14 '14 at 5:39

GDB lets you call C functions directly from the command line. So you could do

(gdb) call setbuf(stdout, NULL)

Now, the only problem with that is that I don't know of a way to 'get' the real value of stdout at runtime.

EDIT This might help (from the docs):

call setbuf(fdopen(1, "w"), 0)
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@Yorkwar: Found a possible 'hacky' way to get setbuf to work on the stdout fd via a duplicate stream object. Don't know about side-effects. Could you give it a whirl? –  sehe Nov 24 '11 at 1:57
    
(gdb) call setbuf(stdout, 0) works. My probram is in C. But the solution is gdb tells the program, not gdb do it itself. And buffer for stdio is disabled all the time, which can affect the performance of the program. However, it's a workaround. –  Yorkwar Nov 24 '11 at 3:45

If you define a function in your program:

void flush_all(void) {
    fflush(NULL);
}

you can call this function from within gdb(1) with:

call flush_all()

A short demo:

$ cat cat.c
#include <stdio.h>

int main(int argc, char* argv[]) {
    printf("this is a partial write");
    printf("this is a partial write");
    printf("this is a partial write");
    printf("this is a partial write");
    printf("this is a partial write");

    return 0;
}

void flush_all(void) {
    fflush(NULL);
}

$ gcc -g -o cat cat.c
$ gdb
GNU gdb (Ubuntu/Linaro 7.2-1ubuntu11) 7.2
Copyright (C) 2010 Free Software Foundation, Inc.
License GPLv3+: GNU GPL version 3 or later <http://gnu.org/licenses/gpl.html>
This is free software: you are free to change and redistribute it.
There is NO WARRANTY, to the extent permitted by law.  Type "show copying"
and "show warranty" for details.
This GDB was configured as "x86_64-linux-gnu".
For bug reporting instructions, please see:
<http://www.gnu.org/software/gdb/bugs/>.
(gdb) file cat
Reading symbols from /home/sarnold/tmp/cat...done.
(gdb) break printf
Breakpoint 1 at 0x400428
(gdb) run
Starting program: /home/sarnold/tmp/cat 

Breakpoint 1, __printf (format=0x4006bc "this is a partial write") at printf.c:30
30  printf.c: No such file or directory.
    in printf.c
(gdb) cont
Continuing.

Breakpoint 1, __printf (format=0x4006bc "this is a partial write") at printf.c:30
30  in printf.c
(gdb) cont
Continuing.

Breakpoint 1, __printf (format=0x4006bc "this is a partial write") at printf.c:30
30  in printf.c
(gdb) call flush_all()
this is a partial writethis is a partial write(gdb) ^CQuit
(gdb) quit
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1  
I think of a workaround with "commands" of GDB: (gdb) commands 1-N >call flush_all() >end Where N is large number to cover all my breakpoints –  Yorkwar Nov 24 '11 at 3:48

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