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I'm trying to make a table that has a "created" timestamp and an "updated" timestamp (and have MySQL insert values in there automatically for me). It's doable, see: http://gusiev.com/2009/04/update-and-create-timestamps-with-mysql/.

As a first step, I copied the example table from the reference site and modeled it in Workbench. I then did a forward engineer and tested the resulting SQL in phpMyAdmin. Everything worked. Here was the SQL:

-- -----------------------------------------------------
-- Table `test_table`
-- -----------------------------------------------------

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `test_table` ;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `test_table` (
  `id` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  `stamp_created` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00' ,
  `stamp_updated` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT now() on update now() ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`id`) )
ENGINE = InnoDB;

After verifying that the idea works, I then implemented the concept in one of my actual tables. The resulting SQL was this:

-- -----------------------------------------------------
-- Table `user_login`
-- -----------------------------------------------------

DROP TABLE IF EXISTS `user_login` ;

CREATE  TABLE IF NOT EXISTS `user_login` (
  `user_login_id` INT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT ,
  `user_id` INT NOT NULL ,
  `hashed_password` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `provider_id` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `provider_name` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `unverified_email_address` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `verification_code_email_address` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `verification_code_password_change` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `verified_email_address` CHAR(255) NULL ,
  `stamp_created` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT '0000-00-00 00:00:00' ,
  `stamp_updated` TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT now() on update now() ,
  `stamp_deleted` TIMESTAMP NULL ,
  PRIMARY KEY (`user_login_id`) ,
  INDEX `user_login_user_id` (`user_id` ASC) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `verified_email_address_UNIQUE` (`verified_email_address` ASC) ,
  UNIQUE INDEX `unverified_email_address_UNIQUE` (`unverified_email_address` ASC) ,
  CONSTRAINT `user_login_user_id`
    FOREIGN KEY (`user_id` )
    REFERENCES `user` (`user_id` )
    ON DELETE NO ACTION
    ON UPDATE NO ACTION)
ENGINE = InnoDB;

When I execute the SQL, I get the following error:

#1067 - Invalid default value for 'stamp_created'

Anyone see what's causing my problem?

share|improve this question
    
I had to remove the FK restraint(for obvious reasons), but it ran fine via MySQL Query Browser for me... peculiar. Even more peculiar after reading the link in bensiu's answer. –  Sean Walsh Nov 24 '11 at 3:23
    
When I run the SQL, it doesn't complain about the FK constraint (I do not have "user" table in my DB -- it's basically empty). I'm not even getting to that error. I guess SQL stops on first error, which must be this stamp_created problem. Weird to me is that it looks exactly the same as in the sample table. –  StackOverflowNewbie Nov 24 '11 at 3:30
    
What version of MySQL? –  Sean Walsh Nov 24 '11 at 3:35
    
protocol_version = 10, version = 5.1.36-community-log. yours? –  StackOverflowNewbie Nov 24 '11 at 3:39
    
I'm on 5.5.8. Also, can we see the results from SELECT @@sql_mode;? –  Sean Walsh Nov 24 '11 at 3:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 1 down vote accepted
stamp_created TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT 0,

or

stamp_created TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT 0 ON UPDATE CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,

depending on your needs, however in your case logical should be:

  stamp_created TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP,

http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/timestamp.html

share|improve this answer
    
bensui, why does it have to be 0? It was '0000-00-00 00:00:00' in the first table -- and that worked fine. –  StackOverflowNewbie Nov 24 '11 at 3:20
    
By the way, I tried your suggestion to use 0 as the default. Same error. –  StackOverflowNewbie Nov 24 '11 at 3:24
    
bensui, if I only had one timestamp column, I could do stamp_created TIMESTAMP NULL DEFAULT CURRENT_TIMESTAMP. But I have more than one timestamp column and I'm trying to default them to the current_timestamp. MySQL doesn't allow that. –  StackOverflowNewbie Nov 24 '11 at 3:26

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