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I'm looking to build two functions:

var MyObject = new Object();
MyObject.MyProperty = 1;

function ListenToChange() {
  here I want to listen to changes in MyProperty1 and do something when it changes
}

function ThrowEvent () {
  here I change the value of MyProperty every 5 seconds
  setTimeOut('ThrowEvent', 5000);
}

I looked at the addEventListener property but it looks like it works for DOM objects. I thought of using the ThrowEvent function to change the value of a hidden div and listen for the changes in the value of the hidden with $('#HiddenDiv').change() but I'm wondering if there's a better way to do it with the addEventListener.

Thanks for your help.

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1  
How about using a setter function to alter myproperty and then firing ListenToChange from there? Although I am curious about the answer to this. +1 for a good question/ –  mrtsherman Nov 24 '11 at 4:01
1  
set properties in object by using set methods setMyProperty(value), which would execute handling as well –  bensiu Nov 24 '11 at 4:01
    
@mrtsherman: how does this work in code? –  frenchie Nov 24 '11 at 4:03
1  
I think I'll let this guy explain it - ejohn.org/blog/javascript-getters-and-setters John Resig is known by a few more people than I am. –  mrtsherman Nov 24 '11 at 4:07
    
I'm wondering if event delegation might help here. –  Jared Farrish Nov 24 '11 at 4:07

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

I can infer from your example you're using jQuery; you could trigger a custom event anytime you change the value of your property:

var my_obj = {my_prop: 1}

function ListenToChange(event, newval) {
  console.log('my_prop is now' + newval)
}
$.bind("propchange:my_prop", ListenToChange)

function ThrowEvent () {
  $.trigger('propchange:my_prop', my_obj.my_prop)
  setTimeOut('ThrowEvent', 5000);
}
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Ok, thanks for the wrapper; I'm wrapping my head around the code. Can you add just a few comments in your code to show where the listening occurs and change the variable names to more meaningful name. I think your code looks fantastic. –  frenchie Nov 24 '11 at 4:36
    
I've removed the setter, it's complicated and you don't actually need it for your example. Just bind and trigger a custom event for when you're setting it. –  jdeseno Nov 24 '11 at 4:42
    
Thanks, very geeky, nice. –  frenchie Nov 24 '11 at 4:43
    
Let's say in ThrowEvent I want to change the value to 11, I do this: $.trigger('propchange:my_prop', 11); ? –  frenchie Nov 24 '11 at 4:45
1  
Well, without the setter you still need to set it, the event is just so you're notified of the change. $.trigger('propchange:my_prop', my_obj.my_prop=11) would do both. –  jdeseno Nov 24 '11 at 5:00

Well here is an example of what I came up with. It is not nearly as glamorous as John's example, but it gets the job done. Recommendations for improvements are more than welcome.

http://jsfiddle.net/yKYRs/

var MyObject = new Object();

MyObject.MyProperty = 1;

MyObject.MyProperty_Set = function(val) {   
    this.MyProperty = val;   
    ListenToChange();
}

function ListenToChange() {
    console.log('My Property was changed');
}

MyObject.MyProperty_Set(2);
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Ok, this looks really sweet and simple. –  frenchie Nov 24 '11 at 4:39

It seems that you are after ES5 set and get, however they won't work in an ECMAScript Ed 3 environment, you'll need to write your own getter and setter functions for that.

If you want to listen for changes to the DOM, there is a W3C DOM 2 Events specification that includes mutation events, however I don't think it was ever widely implemented. There is a level 3 working draft that deprecates a number of the level 2 features.

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