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I want to split a string with multiple patterns:

ex.

my $string= "10:10:10, 12/1/2011";

my @string = split(/firstpattern/secondpattern/thirdpattern/, $string);

foreach(@string) {
    print "$_\n";
}

I want to have an output of:

10
10
10
12
 1
2011

What is the proper way to do this?

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7 Answers 7

up vote 19 down vote accepted

Use a character class in the regex delimiter to match on a set of possible delimiters.

my $string= "10:10:10, 12/1/2011";
my @string = split /[:,\s\/]+/, $string;

foreach(@string) {
    print "$_\n";
}

Explanation

  • The pair of slashes /.../ denotes the regular expression or pattern to be matched.

  • The pair of square brackets [...] denotes the character class of the regex.

  • Inside is the set of possible characters that can be matched: colons :, commas ,, any type of space character \s, and forward slashes \/ (with the backslash as an escape character).

  • The + is needed to match on 1 or more of the character immediately preceding it, which is the entire character class in this case. Without this, the comma-space would be considered as 2 separate delimiters, giving you an additional empty string in the result.

share|improve this answer
    
Worked perfectly well! Thanks. Btw, do you mind to explain this code? /[:,\s\/]+/ –  quinekxi Nov 24 '11 at 5:43
    
Thank you for the additional input, that simply explains everything! :D –  quinekxi Nov 24 '11 at 6:15
    
I know it is an old thread, but I am wondering how I should add []() to the list of delimiters? It seems to get rid of the []() when I just add it there. –  KingsInnerSoul Feb 26 at 21:57
1  
@KingsInnerSoul, Add a backslash in front of each of those, just like I have for the slash above –  stevenl Feb 27 at 2:25

Wrong tool!

my $string = "10:10:10, 12/1/2011";
my @fields = $string =~ /([0-9]+)/g;
share|improve this answer
    
Yes, I know, I'm sorry, I didn't know there is another approach on it. –  quinekxi Nov 25 '11 at 3:17
    
@quinekxi, No need to apologise, you didn't do anything wrong. A good reply usually comes from considering the bigger picture. Questions are often too specific. –  ikegami Nov 25 '11 at 4:09
    
Thanks though for giving me something to think of and consider another solution. –  quinekxi Nov 25 '11 at 4:14

If numbers are what you want, extract numbers:

my @numbers = $string =~ /\d+/g;
say for @numbers;

Capturing parentheses are not required, as specified in perlop:

The /g modifier specifies global pattern matching--that is, matching as many times as possible within the string. How it behaves depends on the context. In list context, it returns a list of the substrings matched by any capturing parentheses in the regular expression. If there are no parentheses, it returns a list of all the matched strings, as if there were parentheses around the whole pattern.

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I hadn't known about the behavior you highlighted, thanks, and good for golf too! –  Joel Berger Nov 24 '11 at 16:20
    
I didn't know I could use this kind of approach. Good thinking! Thank you so much! –  quinekxi Nov 25 '11 at 3:00
    
@quinekxi You're welcome. split is a very nice tool, but works best with uniform delimiters, I feel. In this case, the common element is numbers, so it's easier to work with them. –  TLP Nov 25 '11 at 3:09
    
@TLP Yes, actually I used this approach but I didn't mark this as the answer just to comply on the original question. Anyway, thanks for your idea. I am glad I've got such great ideas from strangers you like. –  quinekxi Nov 25 '11 at 3:22
1  
@quinekxi Many of my answers are not the solutions the OPs asked for, but the one I thought they really wanted. Your question was really "How do I best extract the numbers from this string?" So that's the answer you got. :) –  TLP Nov 25 '11 at 3:47

You can split on non-digits;

#!/usr/bin/perl
use strict;
use warnings;
use 5.014;

my $string= "10:10:10, 12/1/2011";
say for split /\D+/, $string;
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As you're parsing something that is rather obviously a date/time, I wonder if it would make more sense to use DateTime::Format::Strptime to parse it into a DateTime object.

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my $string= "10:10:10, 12/1/2011";

my @string = split(m[(?:firstpattern|secondpattern|thirdpattern)+], $string);

my @string = split(m[(?:/| |,|:)+], $string);

print join "\n", @string;
share|improve this answer
    
/| |,|: better written as [/ ,:] –  TLP Nov 24 '11 at 14:37
    
@TLP, is it? IIRC alternations get compiled into a trie internally, does a character class? Not saying you are wrong, really a question. –  Joel Berger Nov 24 '11 at 16:22
    
@JoelBerger I don't know about the internals, but I think it's more readable. Here's a benchmark: perl -wE "use Benchmark qw(cmpthese); $a=qq(10:10:10, 12/1/2011); cmpthese(100000, { Piped => sub { my @r = split (m[(?:/| |,|:)+], $a); }, Class => sub { my @r = split (m[(?:[/ ,:])+], $a); } });" Piped 142450/s -- -27% // Class 194175/s 36% -- Looks like character class is 36% faster. –  TLP Nov 24 '11 at 16:59
    
Oops, didn't see that the m delimiter was brackets. Strange that it didn't complain. Well, with m##, the results go up to 45% faster. –  TLP Nov 24 '11 at 17:03

To answer your original question: you were looking for the | operator:

my $string = "10:10:10, 12/1/2011";

my @string = split(/:|,\s*|\//, $string);

foreach(@string) {
    print "$_\n";
}

But, as the other answers point out, you can often improve on that with further simplifications or generalizations.

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you so much :D –  quinekxi Nov 25 '11 at 3:14
    
Why are you linking to the 5.10.0 version of the page, instead of the version agnostic perldoc.perl.org/perlre.html#Metacharacters ? –  Brad Gilbert Nov 26 '11 at 5:41
    
@Brad Gilbert: Because that was the first one Google gave me, and I'm using 5.10 myself, and portability can potentially be an issue, and I didn't realize there was a version-agnostic version. Thanks for supplying the link. –  reinierpost Nov 28 '11 at 15:48

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