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I have a bunch of testimonials for my site which are currently on a page and am trying to get a div to display each 1 at an interval of 5 seconds, if the array reaches the last value it should start back to beginning of the array again.

Here is what I have so far...

var testimonial = new Array();
testimonial[1] = "Rugby";
testimonial[2] = "Baseball";
testimonial[3] = "Cricket";
var length = testimonial.length
var i = 1;
setInterval(function() {
    while (i <= length) {   
        $('#testimonials p').html(testimonial[i]);
        ++i;
        if (i == length) {
            i == 1;
        }
    }
}, 5000);

Any help would be great, thanks.

share|improve this question
    
use [] instead of new Array(). It is better. –  robert Nov 24 '11 at 5:32
    
I don't know where you took this code from, but in javascript, indexes start with 0 –  qwertymk Nov 24 '11 at 5:33
    
@qwertymk I wrote it and thanks –  Colonel Nov 24 '11 at 5:35
    
Why don't you just put var i = 1; inside the anonymous function in setInterval? That way it will reset itself. And like qwertymk said, indexes start at 0. –  flesk Nov 24 '11 at 5:37
    
It is not quite clear what the question is. What is not working? –  Erno de Weerd Nov 24 '11 at 7:04

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Try

var testimonial = ['Rugby', 'Baseball', 'Cricket'];
var numTestimonials = testimonial.length;
var index = 0;

setInterval(function() {
    $('#testimonials p').text(testimonial[index]);        
    index = (index + 1) % numTestimonials;
}, 5000);

JavaScript arrays are 0-indexed and have handy array literal syntax. Using the modulus operator (%) is an idiomatic way of wrapping a counter back to 0 once it reaches a certain value.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 for conciseness :) –  Stein G. Strindhaug Nov 24 '11 at 5:39
    
@divad12 Thanks for this, is the operator you used the same as the modulus one in php? Again thanks, will accept when I can :) –  Colonel Nov 24 '11 at 5:40
    
Can I ask why you changed it from html() to text(), is there any real difference in using one or the other? –  Colonel Nov 24 '11 at 5:43
    
@Colonel I think so -- it returns the remainder of the first operand divided by the second operand. See developer.mozilla.org/en/JavaScript/Reference/Operators/… –  David Hu Nov 24 '11 at 5:44
    
@Colonel If you just want to display raw strings inside your div, then .text will escape the string for you. See stackoverflow.com/q/1910814/392426 and api.jquery.com/text –  David Hu Nov 24 '11 at 5:46

You can try

setInterval(function() { 
    $('div').html(test[  (i = (i + 1) % length)  ]) },
5000);
share|improve this answer
    
Assuming you start with an index of 0 and not 1 –  qwertymk Nov 24 '11 at 5:36

The function in setInterval is being called every 5 seconds. That means you display the 5 testimonials one after another really quick every 5 seconds instead of displaying them one after the other.

You should do something like:

var testimonial = new Array();
testimonial[1] = "Rugby";
testimonial[2] = "Baseball";
testimonial[3] = "Cricket";
var length = testimonial.length
var i = 0; // arrays start with 0

setInterval(function() {
    $('#testimonials p').html(testimonial[i]);
    i++;
    if (i == length) i = 0;
}, 5000);
share|improve this answer

Many interesting answers, so one more won't hurt. :-)

You can bundle it all up in an immediately called function expression:

(function() { 
  var testimonials = ['Rugby', 'Baseball', 'Cricket'];
  var i = 0;
  setInterval(function() {
    $('#testimonials p').text(testimonials[++i % testimonials.length]);
  }, 5000);
}());
share|improve this answer
    
The behaviour won't be quite the same because of the pre-increment operator; if you start off i at -1, then it will display 'Rugby' as the first item. Also, I thought the idiom for an immediately-called function expression is (function(){ ... })();, while you have (function(){...}()); (close parenthesis placement). –  David Hu Nov 24 '11 at 5:53

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