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I would like to print messages from a SQL Stored Procedure.

If I execture with the SYNC option cmd.ExecuteNonQuery connection fires InfoMessage event, but when I execute with the ASYNC option, the event is not fired.

Is there a reason I am not receiving the events when executing in ASYNC?

Here is my code:

 class Program
{
     static string connstring =
        "data source = xyz;initial catalog = abc;user id=abc;password=abc;Asynchronous Processing=True";
    static void Main(string[] args)
    {

        SqlConnection conn = new SqlConnection(connstring);

            conn.InfoMessage += new SqlInfoMessageEventHandler(conn_InfoMessage);
            SqlCommand cmd = new SqlCommand("TMP_PROC", conn);
            cmd.CommandType = CommandType.StoredProcedure;
            cmd.Parameters.AddWithValue("@TMP_ID", 1);

            try
            {
                Console.WriteLine("connection open");
                conn.Open();
                Console.WriteLine("executing query");
                //cmd.ExecuteNonQuery();
               var result= cmd.BeginExecuteNonQuery(
                    p =>
                    {
                        try
                        {
                            var asyncCommand = p.AsyncState as SqlCommand;
                            Console.WriteLine("Execution Completed");
                        }
                        catch (Exception ex)
                        {
                            Console.WriteLine("Error:::{0}", ex.Message);
                        }
                        finally
                        {
                            conn.Close();
                        }

                    }, cmd);
                int count = 0;
                while (!result.IsCompleted)
                {
                    Console.WriteLine("Waiting ({0})", count++);
                    // Wait for 1/10 second, so the counter
                    // does not consume all available resources 
                    // on the main thread.
                    System.Threading.Thread.Sleep(100);
                }
            }
            catch (Exception ex)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Error:::{0}" ,ex.Message);

            }
            if (conn.State == ConnectionState.Open)
            {
                conn.Close();
            }

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    static void conn_InfoMessage(object sender, SqlInfoMessageEventArgs e)
    {
        foreach (var error in e.Errors)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("---------------------------------------------------");
            Console.WriteLine("Source {0} $ Message{1} $ error{2}", e.Source, e.Message,
                            error.ToString()
                        );    
        }

    }
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3  
Please do not write your posts in uppercase. I thought we left that back in the 90s –  Valamas - AUS Nov 24 '11 at 5:53
3  
"I HAVE TO GET PRINT MESSAGES FROM SQL STORED PROCEDURE." - caps anyone? ....Why would you need to PRINT from a stored proc unless you were debugging? –  Mitch Wheat Nov 24 '11 at 5:53
    
There, fixed it the uppercase stuff. No need to downvote him even further. –  Wim Haanstra Nov 24 '11 at 6:40
    
@Wim: Thanks!! :-) –  Akhil Nov 25 '11 at 18:27
    
As to the point of "Why would you..." the answer is (or rather could be) legacy stored proc support... We cannot always rewrite stored procs just because they are wrought with PRINT statements. This is the case with me, and I would love to have an answer as to why the InfoMessage event isn't firing. In my case, I am simply calling an ExecuteNonQuery() on the command object. But the InfoMessage event appears to be tied to the connection used by the command. Any help is appreciated. –  Taersious Sep 18 '13 at 15:28
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1 Answer

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Very simple; you must call EndExecuteNonQuery(result) in your callback; this will trigger the event. As a general rule, you are required to call the End* method on an IAsyncResult-style Begin* method. A notable exception is Control.BeginInvoke which explicitly does not require this.

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