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I'm working on a library to use in a card game. I spent a couple of hours learning indexers so I could have a Deck class that functions like an array of Card types. Then I achieved the same thing and a whole lot more by inheriting from ArrayList. I therefore ask why one would go to the trouble of making a class indexable when the same thing (and much more) can be achieved via ": ArrayList".

I think my question is pretty self explanatory, but for those who like to look at code.

Here is my Deck class that contains an indexer:

class DeckIndexer
{
    private Card[] myData;
    private int arrSize;



public DeckIndexer(int size)
{
    arrSize = size;
    myData = new Card[size];

    for (int i = 0; i < size; i++)
    {
        myData[i] = null;
    }
}

public Card this[int pos]
{
    get
    {
        return myData[pos];
    }
    set
    {
        myData[pos] = value;
    }
}

public Card this[Card c]
{
    get
    {
        int count = 0;

        for (int i = 0; i < arrSize; i++)
        {
            if (myData[i] == c)
            {
                count++;
            }
        }
        return c;
    }
    set
    {
        for (int i = 0; i < arrSize; i++)
        {
            if (myData[i] == c)
            {
                myData[i] = value;
            }
        }
    }
  }
}

Now here is the second solution, inheriting from ArrayList

  class DeckInheritence : ArrayList
  {

  }

The second solution gives me 20+ methods for free, [] syntax, and saves me however many lines of code. The first gives me [] syntax, the methods attached to object, and is hard to implement.

BTW, yes I can see that ArrayList is giving me an array of objects, not cards, but there is not much fudging to get it to require a Card type.

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arrSize can be replaced with myData.Length, no need to have it twice –  Firo Nov 25 '11 at 16:24
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2 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Firstly, unless you are in .NET 1.1, List<Card> would be preferable. However, as for inheriting... if all you are doing is representing a list of cards, I would just use List<Card> (with neither encapsulation nor inheritance).

As for the why; encapsulation is useful when being a list is not the primary purpose of a type, but it is useful for the caller to have access to a few methods like indexers. As Jon notes, inheriting doesn't (for example) give you any control over what the user does to your data.

Personally, I don't recommend inheriting from List<T> (or ArrayList); that binds an implementation detail into the actual type declaration (changing inheritance is a breaking change).

If you want to expose lots of methods with minimal work, all you need to do is provide IEnumerable<T> (as an interface) - then all of LINQ becomes available. So if you need something bespoke (more than List<Card>) my advice would be:

  • encapsulate List<T> (i.e. a private field)
  • implement IEnumerable<T> if appropriate (just return theList.GetEnumerator())
  • add any specific members you want (indexers etc)
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OK. I'll try just that. Thanks! –  endlessnameless Nov 24 '11 at 6:56
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Fundamentally a Deck is not an ArrayList or a List<Card>. Do you want callers to be able to add as many cards as they want to it? I doubt it. How about null or duplicate values? Again, unlikely to be useful.

This is a perfect situation for using composition instead of inheritance. I wouldn't use an array directly within the type - I'd use a List<T> - but you almost certainly want to write more domain-specific code for your deck. There are obvious constraints, deck-specific operations etc. Do you really want to be able to access any item in the deck? I would expect you to want to be able to deal a deck to players, and shuffle it, for example.

The goal should be to create a type which represents your domain as appropriately as possible - not to give you an indexer with the fewest lines of code.

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Interesting advice Jon. I'll meditate on that heh. I'm not really at the stage in my programming yet where I think too much about preventing what an object can do. I guess I just figure if I don't need the methods I wont use them heh. Of course I am the only one who uses my classes so that's probably why I have a misguided view. Thanks. –  endlessnameless Nov 24 '11 at 6:55
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