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I've got two extensions for IEnumerable:

public static class IEnumerableGenericExtensions
{
    public static IEnumerable<IEnumerable<T>> InSetsOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, int max)
    {
        List<T> toReturn = new List<T>(max);
        foreach (var item in source)
        {
            toReturn.Add(item);
            if (toReturn.Count == max)
            {
                yield return toReturn;
                toReturn = new List<T>(max);
            }
        }
        if (toReturn.Any())
        {
            yield return toReturn;
        }
    }

    public static int IndexOf<T>(this IEnumerable<T> source, Predicate<T> searchPredicate)
    {
        int i = 0;
        foreach (var item in source)
            if (searchPredicate(item))
                return i;
            else
                i++;

        return -1;
    }
}

Then I write this code:

        Pages = history.InSetsOf<Message>(500);
        var index = Pages.IndexOf(x => x == Pages.ElementAt(0));

where public class History : IEnumerable But as a result I've got not '0' as I've expected, but '-1'. I cant understand - why so?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

When you write Pages.IndexOf(x => x == Pages.ElementAt(0));, you actually run InSetsOf many times, due to deferred execution (aka lazy). To expand:

  • Pages = history.InSetsOf<Message>(500) - this line doesn't run InSetsOf at all.
  • Pages.IndexOf - Iterates over Pages, so it starts executing InSetsOf once.
  • x == Pages.ElementAt(0) - this executes InSetsOf again, once for every element in the collection of Pages (or at least until searchPredicate return true, which doesn't happen here).

Each time you run InSetsOf you create a new list (specifically, a new first list, because you use ElementAt(0)). These are two different objects, so comparison of == between them fails.

An extremely simple fix would be to return a list, so Pages is not a deferred query, but a concrete collection:

Pages = history.InSetsOf<Message>(500).ToList();

Another option is to use SequenceEqual, though I'd recommend caching the first element anyway:

Pages = history.InSetsOf<Message>(500);
var firstPage = Pages.FirstOrDefault();
var index = Pages.IndexOf(x => x.SequenceEqual(firstPage));
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Thanks a lot! I've absolutely forgot about this LINQ peculiarity. –  Seekeer Nov 24 '11 at 10:16
    
@Seekeer - No problem, happy to help! This is a nasty issue - it easy to make such mistakes. The worst part is when you don't see a bug, but the code seems to work well, but is in fact very slow. (aside from the bug, there's a great difference in the complexity with or without ToList here) –  Kobi Nov 24 '11 at 10:30
    
Yeah, I am starting to understand peoples, who don't like LINQ. By the way, can you recommend any good article/book on LINQ queries efficiency and optimizing? –  Seekeer Nov 24 '11 at 13:00
1  
@Seekeer - There is one I can think of. Jon Skeet had a long series of articles in which he reimplements Linq to Objects, which I found very interesting. As for Linq: most complaints are against Linq-to-Sql being too slow. Linq-to-Objects can save a lot of code, IMO, it is worth "liking". Linq is a tool, and you should know when tools help you and when they get in your way. –  Kobi Nov 24 '11 at 13:17
    
Thanks for the information. "Аnd you should know when tools help you and when they get in your way" i thinks this words must be the motto of all developers. –  Seekeer Nov 24 '11 at 18:40

Does your class T implement the IComparable? If not, your equality check might be flawed, as the framework does not know exactly when T= T. You would also get by just overriding equals on your class T I would guess.

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