Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is this code correct?

void foo ( int* p )
{
  if ( int* p2 = p ) // single "="
  {
    *p2++;
  }
}

I always been thinking it's not, but recently i've saw such code in a colleague's of mine sources.

What if "p" is NULL? MS VS 2008 works correct but shows "warning C4706: assignment within conditional expression".

Thank you.

share|improve this question
2  
Yes, in a sufficient new version of the C++ standard (C++03 or C++11) –  Basile Starynkevitch Nov 24 '11 at 7:19
1  
I think its warning you simply that your defintion pointer to an int will go out of scope if it fails the conditional. So as long as it doesn't fail the condition you can perform you assignmnet within the if statement, but not within an else statement or outside the if statement. –  RetroCoder Nov 24 '11 at 8:02
    
@BasileStarynkevitch Or C++98. It wasn't legal in the ARM, but it has been legal in all ISO standard C++. –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 8:56
2  
if (mind m = blown) ++vote; // +1 –  Mehrdad Nov 24 '11 at 8:57

8 Answers 8

up vote 3 down vote accepted

By raising warning C4706, the compiler is simply questioning whether you actually meant to write if ( int* p2 == p ) instead of if ( int* p2 = p ) as shown.

Per 6.4 of the 2003 C++ Standard, if ( int* p2 = p ) is legal:

The value of a condition [if (condition)] that is an initialized declaration in a statement other than a switch statement is the value of the declared variable implicitly converted to type bool.

If p is NULL, condition (int* p2 = p) fails because the value of p2 is 0, and thus implicitly false, and *p2 is not incremented.

share|improve this answer
    
soooo... this post is upvoted and accpted, despite being wrong (if ( int* p2 == p ) isn't legal and not helpful if it were). Someone help me out with this?! –  sehe Nov 24 '11 at 7:34
    
Warning C4706 is flagging if ( int* p2 = p ) as a possible spot where you actually meant to use == (even if the expression would be wrong -- go figure). –  Gnawme Nov 24 '11 at 7:42
    
@sehe It's perfectly legal. Check out 6.4 "The value of a condition that is an initialized declaration in a statement other than a switch statement is the value of the declared variable contextually converted to bool" –  Pubby Nov 24 '11 at 7:52
    
@Pubby: Ok, I scanned it; nowhere can I find that you can declare a new variable inside the condition, while not initializing but still comparing the (undefined) value to another in the condition expression.... Did you (a) try to compile it (b) see the == instead of =? –  sehe Nov 24 '11 at 7:57
1  
@sehe It varies. With regards to acceptance, the system might be improved by not allowing an answer to be accepted until a certain time after the question was posted; all too often, the poster doesn't know enough C++ to distinguish between "correct" and "seems to work in my environment", and accepts the first answer which seems to work (presumably to regret it when later answers point out the flaws in the accepted answer). As for votes, if there are a lot, maybe, but when there aren't many voters, the results seem fairly random to me. –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 10:21

The warning assignment within conditional expression is usually issued by compilers to prevent cases where you write

 if (a = b) 
 {

where you meant

 if (a == b) // big difference!
 {

In your sample, the 'assignment warning' is actually bogus, since it is, in fact, not an assignment, but rather an intialization:

 {
      int *p2 = p;
      if (p2)
      {

      }
 }

and there is no risk that you'd actually wanted the syntax error (int *p2 == p ?!) instead :)

The rest of your post is perfectly valid C++03 (and later) and just does what it says1.


1 (which in terms of lasting effect, isn't much because

  • p2 is dereferenced without ever doing something with it
  • p2 is incremented without ever doing something with it,

but I guess that's just the sample code? In case it isn't obvious, *p2++ is equivalent to *p2; p2++;)

share|improve this answer
    
That's the way voting works here. It's more or less random, or a popularity contest, wrong answers are often voted up and accepted, and correct answers voted down. Your answer is correct; about the only possible criticism I can think of is that you didn't also say that there was no "conditional expression" either. (Not that that's important---the absence of assignment is the critical issue, showing that whoever put that message in the compiler didn't understand C++.) –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 9:05
    
@JamesKanze: nicely put, I'm happy enough now; things have balanced out a bit better in the long run –  sehe Nov 24 '11 at 12:17

It's formally correct (in C++, but not in C). Allowing a definition as a conditional was added with dynamic_cast, to support such things as:

if ( Derived* p = dynamic_cast<Derived*>( ptrToBase ) ) {
    //  ...
}

The argument was that there would never be a moment where p was in
scope, but not null. After the if, p is no longer in scope.

The argument doesn't hold water, since on one hand, if you add an else, within the else block, p is in scope, and null. And the justification involving limiting the scope really isn't very strong anyway, because if the function is long enough for it to matter, the function is too long and too complex. This construct supports things like:

if ( Derived1* p = dynamic_cast<Derived1*>( ptrToBase ) ) {
    // ...
}
if ( Derived2* p = dynamic_cast<Derived2*>( ptrToBase ) ) {
    // ...
}
// ...

But this really isn't something you want to do in good code.

All in all, I'd avoid the construct, replacing it with something like:

int* p2 = p;
if ( p2 != NULL ) {
    //  ...
}

It's more explicit and more readable. It does mean that p2 is in scope outside the if, but I'd argue that if this causes any problems, the function itself needs refactoring, because it is too long and too complex.

EDIT:

With regards to the warning: it's a complete idiocy on the part of the compiler. There's no assignment within the conditional expression: there's no assignment, period, and there's no “conditional expression” the condition in the original is a declaration, not an expression. If the compiler wanted to warn about something (on stylistic grounds, because it agrees with me that this is bad style), then it should warn about an implicit conversion to bool. (And of course, whether this warning is emitted should be under control of an option. The compiler should compile the language, not impose style, unless one asks it explicitly to warn about specific style issues.)

share|improve this answer
    
Could you eplain why there is no assigments? Isn't 'if( int* p2 = p )' an assignment? –  fogbit Nov 24 '11 at 10:02
    
@fogbit No. It's a declaration. The = sign is pure syntax here, not an operator. –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 13:15

the code is error prone (why not break it into 2 statements) but otherwise correct. if you break this into:

void foo ( int* p )
{
  int* p2 = p;
  if ( p2 ) 
  {
    *p2++;
  }
}

it is more readable and won't give you the warning. You can see it's also correct (in case of null you are just assigning p2 with null, which is ok).

share|improve this answer
    
I agree that you should rewrite it as above, but the point of doing so is to be able to make the if explicit: if ( p != NULL ), and avoid the confusing implicit conversion pointer to bool. –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 9:00
    
I wouldn't rewrite it as above, I'd rewrite it if (p) { int *p2 = p; ... }. Optionally if (p != 0) or if (p != NULL) instead of if (p). Or actually I'd rewrite it return;, since the questioner's function does nothing... –  Steve Jessop Nov 24 '11 at 9:27

If p is NULL, the condition fails. So the code is ok.

share|improve this answer

This code seems odd. It's correct, but I fail to see in which cases is it useful.
It's less readable then simple alternatives (like Oren S. mentioned), and needlessly defines a new variable in order to increment (*p). The parameter p is already a new variable on the stack, why create another one?

share|improve this answer
    
The code creates a pointer within if-statement and deletes it at the statement end. Using Oren's variant forces a programmer to write addiditional "{}" in this case, which makes the coe less readble IMHO. –  fogbit Nov 24 '11 at 8:02
    
@fogbit How does Oren's variant for an additional "{}"? –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 8:45
    
@JamesKanze: { int* p2 = p; if (p2) *p2++; }. One has to embrace the code in "{}" if he doesn't want "p2" to exist after "*p2++" operation. –  fogbit Nov 24 '11 at 10:00
    
@fogbit it's true that p2 will exist after the if in Oren S.'s variant, but what you say enhances my point. Why define p2 in the first place? –  Neowizard Nov 24 '11 at 12:10
    
@fogbit And why wouldn't one "want" p2 after the operation? What problem does it cause? Who cares if it's in scope or not? –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 13:13

I think grammatically the code has no problem. But it is not a good style. If you definitely know there is single "=", you can also wite like this:

if ((int* p2 = p) != NULL)
{
    *p2++;
}

I prefer the pointer compares to NULL.

share|improve this answer
1  
No you can't. Your version is not legal C++; you can't put a declaration in parentheses, as part of a larger expression. –  James Kanze Nov 24 '11 at 8:36

Look at int* p as this "p is a pointer to an int". And, "p2 is also a pointer to an int". You are making p2 point to the pointer that p is also pointing to when you say p2 = p. The statement *p2++; will increment the address by 4 and point to something besides the int you were originally pointing to. Whichi should be a 32bit integer. The pointer increments by 4 on a 32bit compiler. If you use (*p2)++ wrapped in parenthesis it will increment the integer the pointer is pointing to.

Yes it works... wierd.

int ClassPtr::MethodA(int *p)
{
    if (int *p2 = p)
    {
       (*p2)++;
       return *p2;
    }
          return 0; 
}
share|improve this answer
    
BTW 0 Errors and 0 Warnings! :) –  RetroCoder Nov 24 '11 at 7:58

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.