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I have a server where the public root is located at: /var/www/example.com/html/.

Using $_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']); I get the following result:

/var/www/example.com/html/

What $_SERVER array key would I use to get the path directly above the public root? That is, the one here:

/var/www/example.com/

This will have to work on multiple environments, such as local and live. Not sure if there's some way of doing ./ document_root sort of thing.

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migrated from serverfault.com Nov 24 '11 at 7:53

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2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

dirname() returns the parent directory of a directory and is platform independent.

dirname($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']);

Should return:

/var/www/example.com

If you need the trailing slash then you can append DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR:

dirname($_SERVER['DOCUMENT_ROOT']) . DIRECTORY_SEPARATOR;
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Be carefull with dirname on DOCUMENT_ROOT. If your docroot does not have an trailing slash, e.g. /var/www/example.com, dirname would change this into /var/www! –  breiti Nov 24 '11 at 7:58
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../ is the unixey way to say the folder above so, for example, in a terminal these are the same thing: /home/user/ /home/user/heavymark/../

If OTOH you need support for Windows directory naming you will have to do the work of removing the last bit of the path. Normally you might do this by using a regular expression to capture all but the last filepathbit/ but to support Windows naming you have to fancy it up to handle both filepathbit/ and filepathbit.

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../ works perfectly on Windows also. –  Boann Nov 24 '11 at 8:00
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