Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Take a guess ... how long will this program take to produce the very first output when i == 0? It should be instant, right? And through lazy evaluation of the yield it should produce output in rapid succession after that, right?

static void Main(string[] args)
{
   Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.StartNew();
   int i = 0;
   foreach (var item in massiveYieldStatement())
   {
        if (i++ % 10000 == 0) 
           Console.WriteLine(stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds / 1000);
   }
   Console.ReadKey();
}

static IEnumerable<string> massiveYieldStatement()
{
   yield return "a"; 
   yield return "a";

   .. repeat 200,000 times !!

   yield return "a";
}

But it doesn't! It sits there with no output for between 4 and 21 minutes and then completes quickly - under 60ms in one case! During those minutes, 100% of one core's worth of CPU is used and memory usage grows. In the actual scenario where I encountered this a Stackoverflow exception is thrown before the first iteration even happens! I have tried it in debug mode in Visual Studio and in release mode from the command prompt. I have tried it on Windows 7 x64 and Windows Server 2008 R2 x64.

Can anyone explain what's happening here? Does it repro for you?

NOTE: This is not the real code: the real code has far fewer yield statements but is much more complex. This is just the simplest repro.

share|improve this question
3  
Honestly, 200000 yield statements? I'm glad the C# team didn't waste their time optimizing that one... I never looked into how yield is implemented, but I guess your answer is there. How close is this to the real code you have (that "actual scenario")? –  Kobi Nov 24 '11 at 8:11
4  
If you know if completes in 60ms, it sounds like the pause happens before any of your code executes, leading me to assume that there is a problem with the JIT compiler. Odds are it is trying to optimize a 200,000-case switch statement, causing some pathological behavior. Is there any reason you should need an iterator with so many yield statements? –  Gabe Nov 24 '11 at 8:12
1  
Execute your foreach twice. If it's really fast the second time, it's probably the one time JITting overhead that explains your observations. –  Ani Nov 24 '11 at 8:17
    
It's not actually 200,000 in the real code. This is just the simplest repro case that shows it. I can change it to an array but it doesn't seem right that the code would degrade so badly in this fairly simple situation. –  Ian Mercer Nov 24 '11 at 8:20
1  
Did you try what Ani recommended? It would prove it to be a JIT "problem", if it is... –  Bond Nov 24 '11 at 8:29
show 2 more comments

2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

The assembly produced by this code is a few MB large. yield return is a special beast, in that it looks deceptively simple but the C# compiler actually generates a class ('state machine') to implement the massiveYieldStatement method. I'm pretty sure that you're waiting for the JIT compiler to compile the MoveNext() method of that class (you can verify that with ildasm: if you try to open the MoveNext() method it takes a lot of time as well).

share|improve this answer
    
Yes, ildasm falls over too. –  Ian Mercer Nov 24 '11 at 8:48
add comment

the problem is not the yield, but the function that returns the 200K yields (btw. 100K lines already slowed down my VS). It needs to be evaluated and generate a state class new every time you do your first MoveNext() on the IEnumerator returned from IEnumerable<string>.GetEnumerator.

static IEnumerable<string> massiveYieldStatement()
{
    for(int i = 0; i < 200000; ++i)
        yield return "a";
}

runs fast as expected since evaluation is fast.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.