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I need to call a method from within a function, so I must pass it as an array like so:

array($this, 'display_page');

but I need to pass arguments along with it. Is this possible?

EDIT - New Method - Still not working.

I have now tried passing an anonymous function, in place of the array call back.

function(){MyClass::display_page($display);}

and edited the function thusly:

class MyClass{

static function display_page($arg = false)
    {
      if($arg){
        echo $arg;
      } else {
        echo "Nothing to report!";
      }
     }
}

but all I get is Nothing to report!

EDIT The problem lies with the way the callback was being used within Wordpress (didn't think it was relevant, turns out it was). Have voted to close.

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Please clarify. You need to pass arguments along with the callback function reference? That's... unusual. –  deceze Nov 24 '11 at 10:06
2  
You don't need to use & in PHP for a callback of an object method. –  hakre Nov 24 '11 at 10:08
    
@deceze yes, it's either that or write several different callbacks where only one line changes. –  Mild Fuzz Nov 24 '11 at 10:11
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

If you take a look at call_user_func, you can see that it has a second optional parameter called parameter.

mixed call_user_func ( callback $function [, mixed $parameter [, mixed $... ]] )

Use that.

Or you could do it the dirty way like mentioned in the comment on call_user_func

$method_name = "AMethodName";
$obj = new ClassName();
$obj->{$method_name}();
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This method doesn't work as it calls the function, rather than passing a reference to it. –  Mild Fuzz Nov 24 '11 at 10:20
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Maybe something along these lines will do:

class Foo {

    public function callMe() {
        $args = func_get_args();
        var_dump($args);
    }

    public function getCallback() {
        $that = $this;
        return function ($oneMoreArg) use ($that) {
            $that->callMe(1, 2, $oneMoreArg);
        };
    }

}

$foo = new Foo;
$callback = $foo->getCallback();
$callback(3);

If you're not running PHP 5.3, the best you can do is probably return a "custom callback array" and "custom call it":

$callback = array($this, 'callMe', 1, 2);

$args = array_splice($callback, 2);
$args[] = 3;
call_user_func_array($callback, $args);
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