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Is there a stopwatch in java because on google I only find codes of stopwatches and they don't work, they give me always 0 miliseconds.

This code that I found doesn't work but I don't see why because the code looks fine to me.

public class StopWatch {

  private long startTime = 0;
  private long stopTime = 0;
  private boolean running = false;


  public void start() {
    this.startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    this.running = true;
  }


  public void stop() {
    this.stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    this.running = false;
  }


  //elaspsed time in milliseconds
  public long getElapsedTime() {
    long elapsed;
    if (running) {
      elapsed = (System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime);
    }
    else {
      elapsed = (stopTime - startTime);
    }
    return elapsed;
  }


  //elaspsed time in seconds
  public long getElapsedTimeSecs() {
    long elapsed;
    if (running) {
      elapsed = ((System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime) / 1000);
    }
    else {
      elapsed = ((stopTime - startTime) / 1000);
    }
    return elapsed;
  }
}
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9  
And how do you determin it didn't work ? (perhaps you're measuring something that takes less time to execute than the accuracy of System.currentTimeMillis()) –  nos Nov 24 '11 at 10:44
5  
Please post the code how you are testing this class... –  Dr. UnitTest Nov 24 '11 at 10:45

9 Answers 9

You'll find one in

http://commons.apache.org/lang/

It's called

org.apache.commons.lang.time.StopWatch

But it roughly does the same as yours. If you're in for more precision, use

System.nanoTime()

See also this question here:

Time measuring overhead in Java

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Use Guava's Stopwatch class.

An object that measures elapsed time in nanoseconds. It is useful to measure elapsed time using this class instead of direct calls to System.nanoTime() for a few reasons:

  • An alternate time source can be substituted, for testing or performance reasons.
  • As documented by nanoTime, the value returned has no absolute meaning, and can only be interpreted as relative to another timestamp returned by nanoTime at a different time. Stopwatch is a more effective abstraction because it exposes only these relative values, not the absolute ones.
Stopwatch stopwatch = Stopwatch.createStarted();
doSomething();
stopwatch.stop(); // optional

long millis = stopwatch.elapsedMillis();

log.info("that took: " + stopwatch); // formatted string like "12.3 ms"
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Spring provides an elegant StopWatch Class.

StopWatch stopWatch = new StopWatch();
stopWatch.start();
     // Do something
stopWatch.stop();
     System.out.println(stopWatch.getTotalTimeMillis());
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The code doesn't work because elapsed variable in getElapsedTimeSecs() is not a float/double.

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try this

import java.awt.event.*;

import java.awt.*;

import javax.swing.*;

public class millis extends JFrame implements ActionListener, Runnable
    {

     private long startTime;
     private final static java.text.SimpleDateFormat timerFormat = new java.text.SimpleDateFormat("mm : ss.SSS");
     private final JButton startStopButton= new JButton("Start/stop");
     private Thread updater;
     private boolean isRunning= false;
     private final Runnable displayUpdater= new Runnable()
         {
         public void run()
             {
             displayElapsedTime(System.currentTimeMillis() - millis.this.startTime);
         }
     };
     public void actionPerformed(ActionEvent ae)
         {
         if(isRunning)
             {
             long elapsed= System.currentTimeMillis() - startTime;
             isRunning= false;
             try
                 {
                 updater.join();
                 // Wait for updater to finish
             }
             catch(InterruptedException ie) {}
             displayElapsedTime(elapsed);
             // Display the end-result
         }
         else
             {
             startTime= System.currentTimeMillis();
             isRunning= true;
             updater= new Thread(this);
             updater.start();
         }
     }
     private void displayElapsedTime(long elapsedTime)
         {
         startStopButton.setText(timerFormat.format(new java.util.Date(elapsedTime)));
     }
     public void run()
         {
         try
             {
             while(isRunning)
                 {
                 SwingUtilities.invokeAndWait(displayUpdater);
                 Thread.sleep(50);
             }
         }
         catch(java.lang.reflect.InvocationTargetException ite)
             {
             ite.printStackTrace(System.err);
             // Should never happen!
         }
         catch(InterruptedException ie) {}
         // Ignore and return!
     }
     public millis()
         {
         startStopButton.addActionListener(this);
         getContentPane().add(startStopButton);
         setSize(100,50);
         setVisible(true);
     }
     public static void main(String[] arg)
         {
         new Stopwatch().addWindowListener(new WindowAdapter()
             {
             public void windowClosing(WindowEvent e)
                 {
                 System.exit(0);
             }
         });
         millis s=new millis();
         s.run();
     }
}
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try this http://introcs.cs.princeton.edu/java/stdlib/Stopwatch.java.html

that's very easy

Stopwatch st = new Stopwatch();
// Do smth. here
double time = st.elapsedTime(); // the result in millis

This class is a part of stdlib.jar

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Use System.currentTimeMillis() to get the start time and the end time and calculate the difference.

class TimeTest1 {
  public static void main(String[] args) {

    long startTime = System.currentTimeMillis();

    long total = 0;
    for (int i = 0; i < 10000000; i++) {
      total += i;
    }

    long stopTime = System.currentTimeMillis();
    long elapsedTime = stopTime - startTime;
    System.out.println(elapsedTime);
  }
} 

More info at this tutorial

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Try this:

/*
 * calculates elapsed time in the form hrs:mins:secs
 */
public class StopWatch
{ 
    private Date startTime;

    public void startTiming()
    {
        startTime = new Date();
    }

    public String stopTiming()
    {
        Date stopTime = new Date();
        long timediff = (stopTime.getTime() - startTime.getTime())/1000L;
        return(DateUtils.formatElapsedTime(timediff));
    }

}

Use:

StopWatch sw = new StopWatch();
...
sw.startTiming();
...
String interval = sw.stopTiming();
share|improve this answer
    
DateUtils is part of Apache Commons, why not just use their StopWatch? –  Kade Hafen Oct 29 '14 at 22:56

user1007522, I don't know why your code doesn't work (looks like asfer already commented on that), but I just had the same issue with getting 0 miliseconds from com.google.common.base.Stopwatch.

I was doing

Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
doSomething();
logger.info("test took:" + stopwatch);

Now I'm doing

Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch().start();
doSomething();
stopwatch.stop();
logger.info("test took:" + stopwatch);

and it works, I get "test took:26.81 s"

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