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I have a sliding section set up as below. I was wondering if I can somehow add easeIn and easeOut when the slide goes up and down.

$('a#slide-up').click(function () {
    $('.slide-container').slideUp(400, function(){
        $('#slide-toggle').removeClass('active');
    });
    return false;
});

$('a#slide-toggle').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

    var slideToggle = this;
    if ($('.slide-container').is(':visible')) {
        $('.slide-container').slideUp(400,function() {
            $(slideToggle).removeClass('active');
        });
    }
    else {
        $('.slide-container').slideDown(400);
        $(slideToggle).addClass('active');
    }
});
share|improve this question
    
Read this api.jquery.com/slideToggle –  hauleth Nov 24 '11 at 11:13

3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can. Please check the documentation of slideDown at jQuery docs;.

By default jQUery implements only linear and swing easing functions. For additional easing functions you have to user jQUery UI


UPDATE:

Acoording to the doc, the second optional argument is a string indicating the name of the easing function.

So,

$('.slide-container').slideUp(400, function(){
        $('#slide-toggle').removeClass('active');
    });

will become

$('.slide-container').slideUp(400,'linear', function(){
        $('#slide-toggle').removeClass('active');
    });

to use linear easing function.

Similarly , for other easing functions also.

share|improve this answer
    
I checked the docs but am still unsure how to implement it. I do have jQuery UI added. Do you think you can show me where to implement easeIn and easeOut? –  John Nov 24 '11 at 12:03
    
Thanks. For the line after else, do I have to do something like this? $('.slide-container').slideDown(400,'linear',''); since there is no function? –  John Nov 24 '11 at 12:20
    
@John, you can leave that, since it is optional. ie, $('.slide-container').slideDown(400,'linear'); will be just fine. –  robert Nov 24 '11 at 12:22
    
Ok, thank you for your help. –  John Nov 24 '11 at 12:25

for slideUp and slideDown you ca add the easing effect:

$(".slide-container").slideUp({
    duration:500,
    easing:"easeOutExpo",
    complete:function(){
         $(slideToggle).removeClass("active");
    }
});

HTH

share|improve this answer

You sure can, make sure you include the jQuery UI script as you do you regular jQuery library and add in the easing parameter to the slideUp() function.

Like so...

$('a#slide-up').click(function () {
    $('.slide-container').slideUp(400,'easeIn', function(){
    $('#slide-toggle').removeClass('active');
});
 return false;
});

$('a#slide-toggle').click(function(e) {
    e.preventDefault();

var slideToggle = this;
if ($('.slide-container').is(':visible')) {
    $('.slide-container').slideUp(400,'easeOut',function() {
        $(slideToggle).removeClass('active');
    });
}
else {
    $('.slide-container').slideDown(400);
    $(slideToggle).addClass('active');
}

});

The same goes for the slideDown()

Theres a whole load of easing functions

share|improve this answer
    
I tried what you suggested by adding the jQuery UI script and adding easeIn and easeOut to those two lines; however, now the slide doesn't slide back up when the toggle or close buttons are clicked. –  John Nov 24 '11 at 12:05

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