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I found this code in Mono reimplementation of cryptographic transforms.

I didn't modify or simplify anything - this is how it actually goes (there are comments like // Dispose unmanaged objects, but nothing is actually done).

Now - the IDisposable-related code seems redundant to me. Can this somehow be simplified / removed completely without breaking something important?

public class ToBase64Transform : ICryptoTransform
{
    private bool disposed;

    ~ToBase64Transform()
    {
        Dispose(false);
    }

    public void Clear()
    {
        Dispose(true);
    }

    void IDisposable.Dispose()
    {
        Dispose(true);
        // Finalization is now unnecessary.
        GC.SuppressFinalize(this);
    }

    protected virtual void Dispose(bool disposing)
    {
        if (disposed) return;

        if (disposing)
        {
        }

        disposed = true;
    }

Full source is located here.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If it wraps unmanaged components, then that is the most appropriate implemntation.

If there aren't any unmanaged components, and it won't be subclassed, then yes; you can remove the finalizer and make it just have a simple Dispose():

public sealed class ToBase64Transform : ICryptoTransform
{
    private bool disposed;

    public void Dispose()
    {
        if (disposed) return;
        // Dispose managed objects
        disposed = true;
    }

If there aren't any managed disposable components either, then ... just don't make it implement IDisposable.

I'm not sure I would expect a "Clear()" method to call "Dispose()", but maybe that is the norm in the context of crypto-streams.

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IDisposable comes from ICryptoTransform. –  Yippie-Ki-Yay Nov 24 '11 at 11:54
1  
@Yippie-Kai-Yay fine, but if you don't actually need it to do anything, just make it a no-op method: void IDisposable.Dispose() {} –  Marc Gravell Nov 24 '11 at 11:56
    
I've updated the code in the question - the protected Dispose does nothing except setting disposed to true. I thought that I could wipe everything here, but now I'm confused :) –  Yippie-Ki-Yay Nov 24 '11 at 11:57
    
M, that makes sense. –  Yippie-Ki-Yay Nov 24 '11 at 11:57

A few points:

  • The public API that Mono expose must match the one provided by Microsoft or things will break. That includes finalizers (even when they are not needed by Mono). It's common for Mono to implement more stuff in managed code than Microsoft (actually very common in cryptography);

  • The type is not sealed so the Dispose(bool) method must be called (e.g. from the finalizer) nor abstract so the IDisposable interface must be implemented;

  • Mono comes with an extensive set of unit tests. When something looks weird it's a good idea to look at them. Matching MS implementation is not always straightforward and the MSDN documentation (while good and frequently updated) is not rarely enough or totally complete/right.

  • In this case the code inside Dispose(bool) is not required. I suspect it comes from a template (or from copy/pasting from another file) or the author was not sure if this code would move into unmanaged code in the future. Removing it is unlikely to change performance/size but fell free to submit a bug report (or pull request) to have it removed.

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That's a completely standard way of implementing IDisposable. Agreed, no work is done, but if it has to be there for compatibility with MS.Net, then it's best done right.

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So, basically, I can't remove the code inside all the methods here, even if no actual work is done? –  Yippie-Ki-Yay Nov 24 '11 at 11:55
    
Of course you can remove the contents of Dispose(bool) and the disposed flag, but what are you actually gaining from doing so? The most important part is the virtual call to Dispose(bool) which will ensure that subclasses can leverage this mechanism. –  spender Nov 24 '11 at 11:57
1  
it is standard when wrapping unmanaged types. If you don't have anything unmanaged, then you shouldn't really have a finalizer (unless you have something else useful to do there, which is exceptionally rare). –  Marc Gravell Nov 24 '11 at 11:57
    
@spender Well, I was sort of astonished by this decision and, well, redundant code should obviously be removed. –  Yippie-Ki-Yay Nov 24 '11 at 11:59
1  
In some ways I agree, but I'm so used to bashing out the same old IDisposable template time after time that this code does not surprise me at all. –  spender Nov 24 '11 at 12:27

A class which inherits from a base which implements IDisposable will generally need to ensure that a call to IDisposable.Dispose will call the base class' dispose logic as well as its own. This requires that at least one one of two conditions must apply:

  1. There must be some means by which the derived class can ask to have derived-class Dispose logic called from the base class' implementation of IDisposable.Dispose(), without having to re-implement IDisposable.Dispose() itself.
  2. If the derived class does re-implement IDisposable.Dispose, there must be some means by which the base class can expose its own disposed logic to the derived class, so the derived class' IDisposable.Dispose routine can call it.

There are a number of ways by which at least one of these conditions could be met; in different situations, different methods might be optimal. Most notably, for classes which have a public Dispose() method which will be semantically identical to IDisposable.Dispose(), it would be easiest to simply have the base class have a public virtual Dispose() method which implicitly implements IDisposable.Dispose. If a derived class overrides that method, it will override the behavior of IDisposable.Dispose, but its Dispose() can call base.Dispose() to activate the parent's dispose logic. This approach has one weakness, however: some class might not want to have a public Dispose() method which is semantically identical to IDisposable.Dispose(). While it might have been workable to use that approach for classes where it is suitable, and some other approach for other classes, Microsoft decided it would be better to have a common approach for all classes.

The idea is that all inheritable classes which implement IDisposable will have a protected virtual method whose signature doesn't match the possibly-public "void Dispose()"; IDisposable.Dispose() will call this method (with a parameter value of True) for all of its disposal logic, and a derived class which overrides this method may call the base disposal logic by calling the corresponding method of its parent. Although Microsoft allowed for the possiblity of a "Finalize" method calling this method with a value of false, there isn't really any need for that. Adding a Finalize method (or C# destructor) to a class which doesn't include all the provisions required for one--including "GC.KeepAlive() calls at key places) can be a breaking change which causes subtle bugs. If a class will need to use unmanaged resources but the parent class does not, that should be handled by defining new finalizable classes to encapsulate unmanaged resources into managed objects, and then have the inherited class hold those managed objects.

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