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I'm currently working on a simple game that is drawn on a form by overriding the OnPaint method. The game requires Keyboard input and was working perfectly until I decided to enhance the GUI and add a few Buttons to the form.

The moment I added these Buttons, the form stopped receiving any Keyboard input, no matter how hard I tried the focus was always on the buttons. This behavior can be replicated by placing any Focus-able Control on the form. (ie. TextBox)

I don't need ANY Kayboard interaction with these buttons, I want the user to interact with them with the mouse only.

I've tried the following techniques to try and get around this problem - none of these worked:

  • 1) Normal KeyDown and KeyUp events of the form. (This is the way I was capturing Keyboard input before placing the buttons.)
  • 2) Overriding the Form's OnKeyDown and OnKeyUp events.
  • 3) Overriding ProcessCmdKey - Works, but cannot differentiate between KeyUp and KeyDown events, so it is inadequate for me.

I also tried create a MessageFilter for the application, but I couldn't force it to capture only the Keyboard keys that I needed.

I've been looking into this for many hours already and can't find a suitable solution. Help would be greatly appreciated.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Here is a sample form with a IMessageFilter for the up and down arrow keys, hope this helps:

public partial class MainForm : Form
{
    private class MessageFilter : IMessageFilter
    {
        public MainForm Main { get; set; }
        public bool PreFilterMessage(ref Message msg)
        {
            const int WM_KEYDOWN = 0x100;
            const int WM_KEYUP = 0x101;
            if (msg.Msg == WM_KEYDOWN)
            {
                var keyData = (Keys)msg.WParam;
                if (keyData == Keys.Down || keyData == Keys.Up)
                {
                    return true; // Process keys before return
                }
            }
            else if (msg.Msg == WM_KEYUP)
            {
                var keyData = (Keys)msg.WParam;
                if (keyData == Keys.Down || keyData == Keys.Up)
                {
                    return true; // Process keys before return
                }
            }
            return false;
        }
    }
    public MainForm()
    {
        this.InitializeComponent();
        Application.AddMessageFilter(new MessageFilter { Main = this });
    }
}

For a list of possible Windows messages check:

List Of Windows Messages

share|improve this answer
    
How can I differentiate between KeyUp and KeyDown events like this? And how can I find the .Msg value of various keys? (Is there a list of such constants somewhere?) –  Acidic Nov 24 '11 at 12:30
    
Wow, I should've looked deeper into the code before commenting. Are 0x100 and 0x101 the codes for ANY keyboard KeyDown & KeyUp inputs? –  Acidic Nov 24 '11 at 12:33
    
Yes, then the pressed key is obtained from msg.WParam. –  João Angelo Nov 24 '11 at 12:34
1  
There is no need to go that low level, since winforms already supports this. See msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… –  Jules Nov 24 '11 at 12:43
    
Welp, I've managed to make this work the way I want to. Thanks a lot. –  Acidic Nov 24 '11 at 13:04

Set the KeyPreview property of the form to True, and then set event.Handled = True when you handle KeyDown/KeyUp. This will ensure that the form gets a chance to handle events before its children. Because you set the handled property to true, the childen won't see the keyboard events.

More info here: http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/system.windows.forms.form.keypreview.aspx

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This doesn't work for me. I think the problem lies in the fact that it's not the Controls who steal the input, rather it's some sort of default behavior of windows forms that steals the input in order to interact with the controls. –  Acidic Nov 24 '11 at 12:52
    
That would be much cleaner but it's not usable. Check the notes section on the MSDN page: "A control on a form may be programmed to cancel any keystrokes it receives. Since the control never sends these keystrokes to the form, the form will never see them regardless of the setting of KeyPreview." –  João Angelo Nov 24 '11 at 12:52
    
Either way, my KeyEvent Methods aren't even being called. –  Acidic Nov 24 '11 at 12:55

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