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I've got a rake task that I am making that needs to insert a value into multiple databases.

I'd like to be able to pass this value into the rake task from the command line, or from another rake task, how can I do this?

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3  
rakefile rdoc –  Brian Maltzan May 19 '11 at 15:57
34  
For anyone who comes here from google, I would recommend reading the docs: rake.rubyforge.org/files/doc/rakefile_rdoc.html. These answers are getting outdated. –  jcollum Jan 29 '12 at 0:18
7  
@jcollum Sadly, that documentation link is now out-of-date as well. Up-to-date documentation is on the Rake website, and source is on the Rake GitHub repo. –  Andrew Marshall Jan 10 '13 at 5:20
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11 Answers

up vote 566 down vote accepted

You can specify formal arguments in rake by adding symbol arguments to the task call. For example:

require 'rake'

task :my_task, :arg1, :arg2 do |t, args|
  puts "Args were: #{args}"
end

task :invoke_my_task do
  Rake.application.invoke_task("my_task[1, 2]")
end

# or if you prefer this syntax...
task :invoke_my_task_2 do
  Rake::Task[:my_task].invoke(3, 4)
end

# a task with prerequisites passes its 
# arguments to it prerequisites
task :with_prerequisite, :arg1, :arg2, :needs => :my_task

# equivalently...
task :with_prerequisite_2, [:arg1, :arg2] => :my_task

# to specify default values, 
# we take advantage of args being a Rake::TaskArguments object
task :with_defaults, :arg1, :arg2 do |t, args|
  args.with_defaults(:arg1 => :default_1, :arg2 => :default_2)
  puts "Args with defaults were: #{args}"
end

Then, from the command line:

> rake my_task[1,2]
Args were: {:arg1=>"1", :arg2=>"2"}

> rake "my_task[1, 2]"
Args were: {:arg1=>"1", :arg2=>"2"}

> rake invoke_my_task
Args were: {:arg1=>"1", :arg2=>"2"}

> rake invoke_my_task_2
Args were: {:arg1=>3, :arg2=>4}

> rake with_prerequisite[5,6]
Args were: {:arg1=>"5", :arg2=>"6"}

> rake with_prerequisite_2[7,8]
Args were: {:arg1=>"7", :arg2=>"8"}

> rake with_defaults
Args with defaults were: {:arg1=>:default_1, :arg2=>:default_2}

> rake with_defaults['x','y']
Args with defaults were: {:arg1=>"x", :arg2=>"y"}

As demonstrated in the second example, if you want to use spaces, the quotes around the target name are necessary to keep the shell from splitting up the arguments at the space.

Looking at the code in rake.rb, it appears that rake does not parse task strings to extract arguments for prerequisites, so you can't do task :t1 => "dep[1,2]". The only way to specify different arguments for a prerequisite would be to invoke it explicitly within the dependent task action, as in :invoke_my_task and :invoke_my_task_2.

Note that some shells (like zsh) require you to escape the brackets: rake my_task\['arg1'\]

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1  
You're right. I have edited the answer to provide more thorough examples. –  Nick Desjardins May 7 '09 at 18:56
3  
To invoke a task within a namespace simpy do: Rake::Task['namespace:task'].invoke –  gaqzi Aug 7 '09 at 1:22
2  
Wow, Nick. I wish I could vote this up twice. Thanks! –  Peeja Apr 22 '10 at 16:57
1  
That's a separate question, Igoru, but the reason your call to invoke only runs once is that rake is dependency-oriented, so it will only execute a task if it is needed. For generic tasks that means if it hasn't already run. To explicitly execute a task regardless of its dependencies or if it is needed, call execute instead of invoke. –  Nick Desjardins Aug 18 '11 at 18:38
4  
Note: According to rake, this syntax for accepting variables in tasks is deprecated: WARNING: 'task :t, arg, :needs => [deps]' is deprecated. Please use 'task :t, [args] => [deps]' instead. –  Ajedi32 Aug 15 '12 at 21:25
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In addition to answer by kch (I didn't find how to leave a comment to that, sorry):

You don't have to specify variables as ENV variables before the rake command. You can just set them as usual command line parameters like that:

rake mytask var=foo

and access those from you rake file as ENV variables like such:

p ENV['var'] # => "foo"
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I've found the answer from these two websites: Net Maniac and Aimred.

You need to have version > 0.8 of rake to use this technique

The normal rake task description is this:

desc 'Task Description'
task :task_name => [:depends_on_taskA, :depends_on_taskB] do
  #interesting things
end

To pass arguments, do three things:

  1. Add the argument names after the task name, separated by commas.
  2. Put the dependencies at the end using :needs => [...]
  3. Place |t, args| after the do. (t is the object for this task)

To access the arguments in the script, use args.arg_name

desc 'Takes arguments task'
task :task_name, :display_value, :display_times, :needs => [:depends_on_taskA, :depends_on_taskB] do |t, args|
  args.display_times.to_i.times do
    puts args.display_value
  end
end

To call this task from the command line, pass it the arguments in []s

rake task_name['Hello',4]

will output

Hello
Hello
Hello
Hello

and if you want to call this task from another task, and pass it arguments, use invoke

task :caller do
  puts 'In Caller'
  Rake::Task[:task_name].invoke('hi',2)
end

then the command

rake caller

will output

In Caller
hi
hi

I haven't found a way to pass arguments as part of a dependency, as the following code breaks:

task :caller => :task_name['hi',2]' do
   puts 'In Caller'
end
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5  
The format for this functionality has changed as this warning states: 'task :t, arg, :needs => [deps]' is deprecated. Please use 'task :t, [args] => [deps]' instead. –  madh Jan 15 '12 at 19:54
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Another commonly used option is to pass environment variables. In your code you read them via ENV['VAR'], and can pass them right before the rake command, like

$ VAR=foo rake mytask
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Frankly I was hoping for rake task -- these --go --to -a program and my task could get them from ARGV. Unfortunately I'm not sure if that's possible however I am currently using your solution: rake var1=val1 var2=val2 –  JasonSmith Aug 3 '10 at 11:24
3  
@jhs: rake blah -- --these --go --to --a-program (note the -- to tell rake that its switches have ended), see stackoverflow.com/questions/5086224/… –  mu is too short Feb 27 '11 at 4:39
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Actually @Nick Desjardins answered perfect. But just for education: you can use dirty approach: using ENV argument

task :my_task do
  myvar = ENV['myvar']
  puts "myvar: #{myvar}"
end 

rake my_task myvar=10
#=> myvar: 10
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i like this one –  RameshVel Jan 9 at 16:15
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If you want to pass named arguments (e.g. with standard OptionParser) and access Rails models you could use something like this:

$ rake user:create -- --user test@example.com --pass 123

note the --, that's necessary for bypassing standard rake arguments.

require 'rake'
require 'optparse'
# Rake task for creating an account

namespace :user do |args|
  desc 'Creates user account with given credentials: rake user:create'
  # environment is required to have access to Rails models
  task :create => :environment do
    options = {}
    OptionParser.new(args) do |opts|
      opts.banner = "Usage: rake user:create [options]"
      opts.on("-u", "--user {username}","User's email address", String) do |user|
        options[:user] = user
      end
      opts.on("-p", "--pass {password}","User's password", String) do |pass|
        options[:pass] = pass
      end
    end.parse!

    puts "creating user account..."
    u = User.new
    u.email = options[:user]
    u.password = options[:pass]
    u.save!
    exit("account created.")
  end
end

exit at the end will make sure that the extra arguments won't be interpreted as rake task.

When rake scripts look like this, maybe it's time to look for another tool that would allow this just out of box.

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4  
From my perspective this really is the best answer. Bypass environment variable kludges, strange syntax with task arguments, the additional benefit for standard --option-names. My only suggestion would be to use exit rather than abort as abort will leave you with a return code of 1 to the shell. If the rake task is a part of a higher-level script it's more common to assume a non-zero exit is some type of error. –  Joe Dec 1 '13 at 16:12
    
Good point, thanks! –  Tombart Dec 1 '13 at 18:00
1  
I agree with Joe, this is the best answer. The natural thing is to use the same interface for passing options to rake as you would when passing options to a script. –  Richard Smith Jan 14 at 13:59
    
I agree this is the best answer. Ain't there a way to bypass the ugly --? Like passing rake arguments to the actual task or something? Like task :my_task, :*args do |t, args| or something? –  Augustin Riedinger Apr 2 at 10:56
    
Besides, I don't understand what the {username} is here for. Where is it used? Why isn't it there in -u {username}? Cheers –  Augustin Riedinger Apr 3 at 6:07
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desc 'an updated version'
task :task_name, [:arg1, :arg2] => [:dependency1, :dependency2] do |t, args|
    puts args[:arg1]
end
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I use a regular ruby argument in the rake file:

DB = ARGV[1]

then I stub out the rake tasks at the bottom of the file (since rake will look for a task based on that argument name).

task :database_name1
task :database_name2

command line:

rake mytask db_name

this feels cleaner to me than the var=foo ENV var and the task args[blah, blah2] solutions.
the stub is a little jenky, but not too bad if you just have a few environments that are a one-time setup

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2  
To prevent frozen strings issues, use dup at the end: db = ARGV[1].dup –  Juanda Jan 18 '13 at 19:26
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To pass arguments to the default task, you can do something like this. For example, say "version" is your argument:

task :default, [:version] => [:build]

task :build, :version do |t,args|
  version = args[:version]
  puts version ? "version is #{version}" : "no version passed"
end

Then you can call it like so:

$ rake
no version passed

or

$ rake default[3.2.1]
version is 3.2.1

or

$ rake build[3.2.1]
version is 3.2.1

However, I have not found a way to avoid specifying the task name (default or build) while passing in arguments. Would love to hear if anyone knows of a way.

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I like the "querystring" syntax for argument passing, especially when there are a lot of arguments to be passed.

Example:

rake "mytask[width=10&height=20]"

The "querystring" being:

width=10&height=20

Warning: note that the syntax is rake "mytask[foo=bar]" and NOT rake mytask["foo=bar"]

When parsed inside the rake task using Rack::Utils.parse_nested_query , we get a Hash:

=> {"width"=>"10", "height"=>"20"}

(The cool thing is that you can pass hashes and arrays, more below)

This is how to achieve this:

require 'rack/utils'

task :mytask, :args_expr do |t,args|
  args.with_defaults(:args_expr => "width=10&height=10")
  options = Rack::Utils.parse_nested_query(args[:args_expr])
end

Here's a more extended example that I'm using with Rails in my delayed_job_active_record_threaded gem:

bundle exec rake "dj:start[ebooks[workers_number]=16&ebooks[worker_timeout]=60&albums[workers_number]=32&albums[worker_timeout]=120]"

Parsed the same way as above, with an environment dependency (in order load the Rails environment)

namespace :dj do
  task :start, [ :args_expr ] => :environment do |t, args|
    # defaults here...
    options = Rack::Utils.parse_nested_query(args[:args_expr])  
  end
end

Gives the following in options

=> {"ebooks"=>{"workers_number"=>"16", "worker_timeout"=>"60"}, "albums"=>{"workers_number"=>"32", "worker_timeout"=>"120"}}
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While passing parameters, it is better option is an input file, can this be a excel a json or whatever you need and from there read the data structure and variables you need from that including the variable name as is the need. To read a file can have the following structure.


  namespace :name_sapace_task do
    desc "Description task...."
      task :name_task  => :environment do
        `enter code here`data =  ActiveSupport::JSON.decode(File.read(Rails.root+"public/file.json")) if defined?(data)
    # and work whit yoour data, example is data["user_id"]

    end
  end

Ejample json


    {
      "name_task": "I'm a task",
      "user_id": 389,
      "users_assigned": [389,672,524],
      "task_id": 3
    }

Execution

`rake :name_task`
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