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How do you convert an int (integer) to a string? I'm trying to make a function that converts the data of a struct into a string to save it in a file.

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printf or one of its cousins should do the trick –  pmg Nov 24 '11 at 13:21
    
possible duplicate of Where is the itoa function in Linux? –  Paul R Nov 24 '11 at 13:27
    
you may also want to see this FAQ on serialization, and maybe the following questions that relate to serialization in C: (a), (b), (c) to achieve your actual intent. –  moooeeeep Nov 24 '11 at 13:35
    
What are you even asking? How to convert an int to a string OR how to convert a string to an int, OR how to convert a struct into a string, OR how to save a struct to a file? There is just no way I can stop myself from downvoting this... –  Lundin Nov 24 '11 at 15:01
1  
My usual pet semantic peeve here. You don't want to convert anything; you want to obtain a string containing a (base 10?) representation of the value of the int. Yeah, I know. It's a very common short cut, but it still bugs me. –  dmckee May 24 at 2:41

5 Answers 5

up vote 9 down vote accepted

EDIT: As pointed out in the comment, itoa() is not a standard, so better use sprintf() approach suggested in the rivaling answer!


You can use itoa() function to convert your integer value to a string.

Here is an example:

int num = 321;
char snum[5];

// convert 123 to string [buf]
itoa(num, snum, 10);

// print our string
printf("%s\n", snum);

If you want to output your structure into a file there is no need to convert any value beforehand. You can just use the printf format specification to indicate how to output your values and use any of the operators from printf family to output your data.

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4  
itoa is not standard - see e.g. stackoverflow.com/questions/190229/… –  Paul R Nov 24 '11 at 13:26
    
@PaulR Now I didn't know that! Thanks for the clarification. –  Christian Rau Nov 24 '11 at 13:31
    
@PaulR Thanks, I didn't know that! –  Alexander Galkin Nov 24 '11 at 13:32

You can use sprintf to do it, or maybe snprintf if you have it:

char str[ENOUGH];
sprintf(str, "%d", 42);

Where the number of characters (plus terminating char) in the str can be calculated using:

(int)((ceil(log10(num))+1)*sizeof(char))
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3  
To be sure tat ENOUGH is enough we can do it by malloc(sizeof(char)*(int)log10(num)) –  hauleth Nov 24 '11 at 13:25
2  
@Hauleth Or even +2, considering that (int)log10(42) is 1. –  Christian Rau Nov 24 '11 at 13:34
4  
Sic!... of course (ceil(log10(num))+1)*sizeof(char) –  hauleth Nov 24 '11 at 13:41
12  
Or you can calculate it at compile-time: #define ENOUGH ((CHAR_BIT * sizeof(int) - 1) / 3 + 2) –  caf Nov 25 '11 at 0:31
    
Who said you need to use dec? You need string! hex would do and it's size is way easier to calculate. –  aragaer Jun 24 '13 at 0:05

After having looked at various versions of itoa for gcc, the most flexible version I have found that is capable of handling conversions to binary, decimal and hexadecimal, both positive and negative is the fourth version found at http://www.strudel.org.uk/itoa/. While sprintf/snprintf have advantages, they will not handle negative numbers for anything other than decimal conversion. Since the link above is either off-line or no longer active, I've included their 4th version below:

char *
itoa (int value, char *result, int base)
{
    // check that the base if valid
    if (base < 2 || base > 36) { *result = '\0'; return result; }

    char* ptr = result, *ptr1 = result, tmp_char;
    int tmp_value;

    do {
        tmp_value = value;
        value /= base;
        *ptr++ = "zyxwvutsrqponmlkjihgfedcba9876543210123456789abcdefghijklmnopqrstuvwxyz" [35 + (tmp_value - value * base)];
    } while ( value );

    // Apply negative sign
    if (tmp_value < 0) *ptr++ = '-';
    *ptr-- = '\0';
    while (ptr1 < ptr) {
        tmp_char = *ptr;
        *ptr--= *ptr1;
        *ptr1++ = tmp_char;
    }
    return result;
}
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+1 for the novel use of "zyx...3210123...xyz". –  chux Sep 15 at 14:56
    
Also, this is considerably faster than sprintf. Could be important when dumping large files. –  Eugene Ryabtsev Oct 17 at 8:56

If you want to output your structure into a file there is no need to convert any value beforehand. You can just use the printf format specification to indicate how to output your values and use any of the operators from printf family to output your data.

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This is old but here's another way.

#include <stdio.h>

#define atoa(x) #x

int main(int argc, char *argv[])
{
    char *string = atoa(1234567890);
    printf("%s\n", string);
    return 0;
}
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1  
Works only for constants, not for variables. –  Nakedible Feb 3 at 22:06

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