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Consider the following code:

#include <iostream>
#include <map>

class Value
{
    public:
        void set(const int intValue){ intValue_ = intValue; }
        int read() const { return intValue_; }
        void replaceIfInMap(){
            std::map<int,int>::iterator it;
            it = valuesToReplace_->find(intValue_);
            if(it != valuesToReplace_->end()){
                intValue_ = it->second;
            }
        }
        Value(std::map<int,int>* valuesToReplace) : valuesToReplace_(valuesToReplace){}
    private:
        std::map<int,int>* valuesToReplace_;
        int intValue_;
};

class Holder    {  
    public:
        void doStuffWithValues(){
            Value a(&valuesToReplace_), b(&valuesToReplace_), c(&valuesToReplace_);
            a.set(1); b.set(2); c.set(3);
            valuesToReplace[2]=5;
            a.replaceIfInMap(); b.replaceIfInMap(); c.replaceIfInMap();
            std::cout << "a: "  << a.read()
                      << " b: " << b.read() 
                      << " c: " << c.read() << std::endl;
        }
    private:
        std::map<int,int> valuesToReplace_;
};

int main()
{
    Holder holder;
    holder.doStuffWithValues();
}

How could I get access to the valuesToReplace_ member in a more convenient (and preferably more elegant) way? I have considered storing the map as a public static member of the class Value, but that would deny the possibility of having multiple instances of the Holder class, as each Holder instance requires a set of Value instances with different replacement settings.

A global map would be an even uglier "solution"...

Calling Value::read() from Holder and doing the map interaction there is not an option as this code is only a simplification and in the real code the equivalent of each instance of Value can store pointers to other instances of the same class rendering the aforementioned method overly complex and bulky.

Why does the above code even work? Holder::valuesToReplace_ is private! Is this just normal C++ behaviour (as you cannot get that pointer without access to the private members of the class anyway)?

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Is this helper class really necessary? Looks like all you're doing could be summarized as: int replace_maybe(int n) { auto it = m.find(n); return it != m.end() ? it->second : n; } –  Kerrek SB Nov 24 '11 at 13:40

2 Answers 2

Why does the above code even work? Holder::valuesToReplace_ is private!

It is private, so Holder::doStuffWithValues can access it because it is a member function, nothing wrong there.

Value a(&valuesToReplace_), b(&valuesToReplace_), c(&valuesToReplace_);
            a.set(1); b.set(2); c.set(3);

Here, all your Value objects have valuesToReplace_ pointing to the same map is that what you want? It seems strange, I would either have a static map (which would make a copy on assignment) or a smart pointer to prevent unexpected deletion (but allow NULL values).

How could I get access to the valuesToReplace_ member in a more convenient (and preferably more elegant) way?

You could keep it private and have public member functions which return begin/end const_iterators for the map, or setIntForInt/getIntForInt accessor methods which are not dependent on internal implementation.

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How about passing a reference to the valuesToReplace map to your replaceIfInMap method?

class Value
{
    public:
        void set(const int intValue){ intValue_ = intValue; }
        int read() const { return intValue_; }

        void replaceIfInMap(std::map<int,int> const& valuesToReplace_){
            std::map<int,int>::const_iterator it;
            it = valuesToReplace_->find(intValue_);
            if(it != valuesToReplace_->end()){
                intValue_ = it->second;
            }
        }

        Value() {}
    private:
        int intValue_;
};

class Holder    {  
    public:
        void doStuffWithValues(){
            Value a, b, c;
            a.set(1); b.set(2); c.set(3);
            valuesToReplace_[2]=5;
            a.replaceIfInMap(valuesToReplace_);
            b.replaceIfInMap(valuesToReplace_);
            c.replaceIfInMap(valuesToReplace_);
            std::cout << "a: "  << a.read()
                      << " b: " << b.read() 
                      << " c: " << c.read() << std::endl;
        }
    private:
        std::map<int,int> valuesToReplace_;
};
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