Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

How can I check if a value is null or empty with XSL?

For example, if categoryName is empty? I'm using a when choosing construct.

For example:

<xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="categoryName !=null">
        <xsl:value-of select="categoryName " />
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="other" />
    </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
share|improve this question
    
Can you expand the code example? –  Nick Allen May 5 '09 at 16:48
    
Depending on your use-case, you probably don't want to use xsl:when for node-tests. Consider <xsl:template match="Category[categoryName[not(node())]]">... together with a <xsl:template match="Category">.... The processor will then make the correct decisions for you and you do not need to write out the business logic in nested xsl:choose anymore. In many cases, using matching templates makes writing stylesheets easier. –  Abel Jul 21 at 2:01

10 Answers 10

up vote 190 down vote accepted
test="categoryName != ''"
share|improve this answer
9  
The detailed semantics of this test is: return true if there is at least one categoryName element whose string value is an empty string. –  jelovirt May 11 '09 at 6:08
10  
@jelovirt did you mean to say if there is at least one categoryName that's NOT an empty string? (I'm an xsl newbie, so forgive any potential stupidity to my question.) –  joedevon Nov 4 '11 at 23:39

Absent of any other information, I'll assume the following XML:

<group>
    <item>
        <id>item 1</id>
        <CategoryName>blue</CategoryName>
    </item>
    <item>
        <id>item 2</id>
        <CategoryName></CategoryName>
    </item>
    <item>
        <id>item 3</id>
    </item>
    ...
</group>

A sample use case would look like:

<xsl:for-each select="/group/item">
    <xsl:if test="CategoryName">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #1 and item #2 -->
    </xsl:if>
    <xsl:if test="not(CategoryName)">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #3 -->
    </xsl:if>
    <xsl:if test="CategoryName != ''">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #1 -->
    </xsl:if>
    <xsl:if test="CategoryName = ''">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #2 -->
    </xsl:if>
</xsl:for-each>
share|improve this answer
10  
Nice to explain the different cases. However, your example is misleading as only the first xsl:when whose test evaluates to true() will be matched, i.e. case 3 and 4 will never match because already case 1 has matched. –  0xA3 May 5 '09 at 18:46
2  
(continued) See w3.org/TR/xslt#section-Conditional-Processing-with-xsl:choose: "The content of the first, and only the first, xsl:when element whose test is true is instantiated." –  0xA3 May 5 '09 at 18:53
5  
I changed the sample to something more meaningful. –  0xA3 May 6 '09 at 18:01
1  
It's appreciated that you included multiple examples to show how each expression results. –  doubleJ Nov 7 '13 at 20:13
1  
I starred the question specifically for this answer, and while the question is pretty old, this one seems much more deserving of being the selected answer –  Patrick Aug 1 at 13:28

From Empty Element:

To test if the value of a certain node is empty

It depends on what you mean by empty.

  • Contains no child nodes: not(node())
  • Contains no text content: not(string(.))
  • Contains no text other than whitespace: not(normalize-space(.))
  • Contains nothing except comments: not(node()[not(self::comment())])
share|improve this answer
    
+1. Some notes. The first bulletpoint also tests for text-content, which is also a node. The second bulletpoint tests for any text node at any depth, if you want to know if the current node does not contain text, but can contain other nodes, you can use not(text()). An alternative to your 2nd bullet is also not(.//text()). As your last bullet shows: there are many ways to consider "nothingness" ;). –  Abel Jul 21 at 1:56

What about?

test="not(normalize-space(categoryName)='')"
share|improve this answer

First two deal with null value and second two deal with empty string.

<xsl:if test="USER/FIRSTNAME">
    USERNAME is not null
</xsl:if>
<xsl:if test="not(USER/FIRSTNAME)">
    USERNAME is null
 </xsl:if>
 <xsl:if test="USER/FIRSTNAME=''">
     USERNAME is empty string
 </xsl:if>
 <xsl:if test="USER/FIRSTNAME!=''">
     USERNAME is not empty string
 </xsl:if>
share|improve this answer
    
Scary. What if there are multiple users or multiple firstnames? Use xsl:apply-templates and matching templates to get what you want, much easier. –  Abel Jul 21 at 2:06

In some cases, you might want to know when the value is specifically null, which is particularly necessary when using XML which has been serialized from .NET objects. While the accepted answer works for this, it also returns the same result when the string is blank or empty, i.e. '', so you can't differentiate.

<group>
    <item>
        <id>item 1</id>
        <CategoryName xsi:nil="true" />
    </item>
</group>

So you can simply test the attribute.

<xsl:if test="CategoryName/@xsi:nil='true'">
   Hello World.
</xsl:if>

Sometimes it's necessary to know the exact state and you can't simply check if CategoryName is instantiated, because unlike say Javascript

<xsl:if test="CategoryName">
   Hello World.
</xsl:if>

Will return true for a null element.

share|improve this answer

Something like this works for me:

<xsl:choose>
  <xsl:when test="string(number(categoryName)) = 'NaN'"> - </xsl:when> 
  <xsl:otherwise> 
    <xsl:number value="categoryName" />
  </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>

Or the other way around:

<xsl:choose>
  <xsl:when test="string(number(categoryName)) != 'NaN'">
    <xsl:number value="categoryName" />
  </xsl:when> 
  <xsl:otherwise> - </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>

Note: If you don't check for/handle null values, IE7 returns -2147483648 instead of NaN.

share|improve this answer
    
This answer nailed my issue down...thanks! –  user1058677 Sep 4 '12 at 16:12

If there is a possibility that the element does not exist in the XML I would test both that the element is present and that the string-length is greater than zero:

<xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="categoryName and string-length(categoryName) &gt; 0">
        <xsl:value-of select="categoryName " />
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="other" />
    </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
share|improve this answer
2  
The string value of an empty node set (which is what the XPath expression categoryName gives you when there are no categoryName child elements in the current context) is defined to be the empty string, so this is redundant - string-length(categoryName) is zero if there are no categoryName elements. –  Ian Roberts Jun 14 '13 at 16:25

I know this question is old, but between all the answers, I miss one that is a common approach for this use-case in XSLT development.

I am imagining that the missing code from the OP looks something like this:

<xsl:template match="category">
    <xsl:choose>
        <xsl:when test="categoryName !=null">
            <xsl:value-of select="categoryName " />
        </xsl:when>
        <xsl:otherwise>
            <xsl:value-of select="other" />
        </xsl:otherwise>
    </xsl:choose>
</category>

And that the input looks something like this:

<categories>
    <category>
       <categoryName>Books</categoryName>
    </category>
    <category>
       <categoryName>Magazines</categoryName>
       <categoryName>Periodicals</categoryName>
       <categoryName>Journals</categoryName>
    </category>
    <category>
        <categoryName><!-- please fill in category --></categoryName>
    </category>
    <category>
        <categoryName />
    </category>
    <category />
</categories>

I.e., I assume there can be zero, empty, single or multiple categoryName elements. To deal with all these cases using xsl:choose-style constructs, or in other words, imperatively, is quickly getting messy (even more so if elements can be at different levels!). A typical programming idiom in XSLT is using templates (hence the T in XSLT), which is declarative programming, not imperative (you don't tell the processor what to do, you just tell what you want output if certain conditions are met). For this use-case, that can look something like the following:

<!-- positive test, any category with a valid categoryName -->
<xsl:template match="category[categoryName[text()]]">
    <xsl:apply-templates />
</xsl:template>

<!-- any other category (without categoryName, "null", with comments etc) -->
<xsl:template match="category">
    <xsl:text>Category: Other</xsl:text>
</xsl:template>

<!-- matching the categoryName itself for easy handling of multiple names -->
<xsl:template match="categoryName">
    <xsl:text>Category: </xsl:text>
    <xsl:value-of select="." />
</xsl:template>

This works (with any XSLT version), because the first one above has a higher precedence (it has a predicate). The "fall-through" matching template, the second one, catches anything that is not valid. The third one then takes care of outputting the categoryName value in a proper way.

Note that in this scenario there is no need to specifially match categories or category, because the processor will automatically process all children, unless we tell it otherwise (in this example, the second and third template do not further process the children, because there is no xsl:apply-templates in them).

This approach is more easily extendible then the imperative approach, because it automically deals with multiple categories and it can be expanded for other elements or exceptions by just adding another matching template. Programming without if-branches.

Note: there is no such thing as null in XML. There is xsi:nil, but that is rarely used, especially rarely in untyped scenarios without a schema of some sort.

share|improve this answer

By my experience the best way is:

<xsl:when test="not(string(categoryName))">
    <xsl:value-of select="other" />
</xsl:when>
<otherwise>
    <xsl:value-of select="categoryName" />
</otherwise>
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.