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How can I check if a value is null or empty with XSL?

For example, if categoryName is empty? I'm using a when choosing construct.

For example:

<xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="categoryName !=null">
        <xsl:value-of select="categoryName " />
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="other" />
    </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
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Can you expand the code example? –  Nick Allen May 5 '09 at 16:48
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9 Answers

up vote 170 down vote accepted
test="categoryName != ''"
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8  
The detailed semantics of this test is: return true if there is at least one categoryName element whose string value is an empty string. –  jelovirt May 11 '09 at 6:08
10  
@jelovirt did you mean to say if there is at least one categoryName that's NOT an empty string? (I'm an xsl newbie, so forgive any potential stupidity to my question.) –  joedevon Nov 4 '11 at 23:39
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Absent of any other information, I'll assume the following XML:

<group>
    <item>
        <id>item 1</id>
        <CategoryName>blue</CategoryName>
    </item>
    <item>
        <id>item 2</id>
        <CategoryName></CategoryName>
    </item>
    <item>
        <id>item 3</id>
    </item>
    ...
</group>

A sample use case would look like:

<xsl:for-each select="/group/item">
    <xsl:if test="CategoryName">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #1 and item #2 -->
    </xsl:if>
    <xsl:if test="not(CategoryName)">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #3 -->
    </xsl:if>
    <xsl:if test="CategoryName != ''">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #1 -->
    </xsl:if>
    <xsl:if test="CategoryName = ''">
        <!-- will be instantiated for item #2 -->
    </xsl:if>
</xsl:for-each>
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9  
Nice to explain the different cases. However, your example is misleading as only the first xsl:when whose test evaluates to true() will be matched, i.e. case 3 and 4 will never match because already case 1 has matched. –  0xA3 May 5 '09 at 18:46
1  
(continued) See w3.org/TR/xslt#section-Conditional-Processing-with-xsl:choose: "The content of the first, and only the first, xsl:when element whose test is true is instantiated." –  0xA3 May 5 '09 at 18:53
4  
I changed the sample to something more meaningful. –  0xA3 May 6 '09 at 18:01
    
How do you test for instances of </CategoryName> ? , empty string tests don't work for this –  raffian Feb 14 '12 at 17:22
1  
It's appreciated that you included multiple examples to show how each expression results. –  doubleJ Nov 7 '13 at 20:13
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From Empty Element:

To test if the value of a certain node is empty

It depends on what you mean by empty.

  • Contains no child nodes: not(node())
  • Contains no text content: not(string(.))
  • Contains no text other than whitespace: not(normalize-space(.))
  • Contains nothing except comments: not(node()[not(self::comment())])
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What about?

test="not(normalize-space(categoryName)='')"
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First two deal with null value and second two deal with empty string.

<xsl:if test="USER/FIRSTNAME">
    USERNAME is not null
</xsl:if>
<xsl:if test="not(USER/FIRSTNAME)">
    USERNAME is null
 </xsl:if>
 <xsl:if test="USER/FIRSTNAME=''">
     USERNAME is empty string
 </xsl:if>
 <xsl:if test="USER/FIRSTNAME!=''">
     USERNAME is not empty string
 </xsl:if>
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In some cases, you might want to know when the value is specifically null, which is particularly necessary when using XML which has been serialized from .NET objects. While the accepted answer works for this, it also returns the same result when the string is blank or empty, i.e. '', so you can't differentiate.

<group>
    <item>
        <id>item 1</id>
        <CategoryName xsi:nil="true" />
    </item>
</group>

So you can simply test the attribute.

<xsl:if test="CategoryName/@xsi:nil='true'">
   Hello World.
</xsl:if>

Sometimes it's necessary to know the exact state and you can't simply check if CategoryName is instantiated, because unlike say Javascript

<xsl:if test="CategoryName">
   Hello World.
</xsl:if>

Will return true for a null element.

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Something like this works for me:

<xsl:choose>
  <xsl:when test="string(number(categoryName)) = 'NaN'"> - </xsl:when> 
  <xsl:otherwise> 
    <xsl:number value="categoryName" />
  </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>

Or the other way around:

<xsl:choose>
  <xsl:when test="string(number(categoryName)) != 'NaN'">
    <xsl:number value="categoryName" />
  </xsl:when> 
  <xsl:otherwise> - </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>

Note: If you don't check for/handle null values, IE7 returns -2147483648 instead of NaN.

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This answer nailed my issue down...thanks! –  user1058677 Sep 4 '12 at 16:12
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If there is a possibility that the element does not exist in the XML I would test both that the element is present and that the string-length is greater than zero:

<xsl:choose>
    <xsl:when test="categoryName and string-length(categoryName) &gt; 0">
        <xsl:value-of select="categoryName " />
    </xsl:when>
    <xsl:otherwise>
        <xsl:value-of select="other" />
    </xsl:otherwise>
</xsl:choose>
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1  
The string value of an empty node set (which is what the XPath expression categoryName gives you when there are no categoryName child elements in the current context) is defined to be the empty string, so this is redundant - string-length(categoryName) is zero if there are no categoryName elements. –  Ian Roberts Jun 14 '13 at 16:25
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By my experience the best way is:

<xsl:when test="not(string(categoryName))">
    <xsl:value-of select="other" />
</xsl:when>
<otherwise>
    <xsl:value-of select="categoryName" />
</otherwise>
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