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As I understand it, I should be able to use a boost:asio asynchronous timer to trigger a callback every n milliseconds whilst my program is doing something else without needing threads. Is that assumption correct ?

I put together the following test program which just prints the handler messages and never prints the rand() values. What I want is to see all the floating point numbers scroll down the screen, then every 250ms a handler message should appear in amongst them.

Here is the code :

#include <iostream>
#include <vector>
#include <cstdlib>

#include <boost/asio.hpp>
#include <boost/date_time.hpp>
#include <boost/thread.hpp>

boost::asio::io_service io_service;
boost::posix_time::time_duration interval(boost::posix_time::milliseconds(250));
boost::asio::deadline_timer timer(io_service,interval);

void handler(const boost::system::error_code& error);

void timer_init() {
   timer.expires_at(timer.expires_at()+interval);
   timer.async_wait(handler);
}

void handler(const boost::system::error_code& error) {
   static long count=0;
   std::cout << "in handler " << count++ << std::endl;
   std::cout.flush();
   timer_init();
}

int main(int argc, char **argv) {
   timer.async_wait(handler);
   io_service.run();

   std::vector<double> vec;
   for (long i=0; i<1000000000; i++) {
      double x=std::rand();
      std::cout << x << std::endl;
      std::cout.flush();
      vec.push_back(x);
   }
   return 0;
}
share|improve this question

This:

io_service.run();

Is a blocking call. It's true that you can have multiple things happening asynchronously in one thread using ASIO, but you cannot have ASIO running in the same thread as code which is not integrated with ASIO. This is a classic event-driven model, where all the work gets done in response to some readiness notification (timers, in your case).

Try moving your vector/rand code to a function and passing that function to io_service::post(), which will then run that code within the context of its run() method. Then when you invoke run(), both things will happen (though not truly concurrently, as that would require threads).

share|improve this answer
    
"you cannot have ASIO running in the same thread as code which is not integrated with ASIO" - this is not exact. One can interleave a main application loop with poll_one calls. – Igor R. Mar 20 '13 at 18:50
    
By the way, if he posts the whole function, the timer handler wouldn't get called until the function is over. – Igor R. Mar 20 '13 at 18:51

As John Zwinck mentioned, io_service::run() blocks - it's a main asio loop that dispatches completion handlers. However, instead of calling run, you can "manually" process the io_service queue by interleaving io_service::poll_one with your loop:

for (long i=0; i<1000000000; i++) {
      double x=std::rand();
      std::cout << x << std::endl;
      std::cout.flush();
      vec.push_back(x);
      io_service.poll_one();
   }
share|improve this answer

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