Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Let us say I have the following class

public class A {
   private B b;
}

Now there is a factory for creating instances of B, but the creator method throws an exception

public class BCreatorFactory {
   public static createB() throws SomeException {
      // DO the intialization
      // ...
      return b;
}

if I set A.b in the declaration line then I would have no way of handling the exception

public class A {
   private B b = BCreatorFactory.createB() // BAD -> no way of dealing with the exception
}

if I set A.b within the constructor then I either have a "half baked" instance or again I throw an exception and force the calling code to handle a not properly initialized instance

public class A {
   private B b;

   public A() {
      try {
         b = BCreatorFactory.createB();
      }
      catch (SomeException se) {
      // Do something, perhaps try to recover ? <- IMO also BAD
      }
   }
}

or

public class A {
   private B b;

   public A() throws SomeException { // BAD
      b = BCreatorFactory.createB();
   }
}

I could try to lazy init B's instance:

public class A {
   private B b;

   public B getB() throws SomeException {
      if (b == null) {
          b = BCreatorFactory.createB(); // BAD -> not thread safe -> can result in redundant createB() invocations
      }
      return b;
   }
}

But the only way I can think of making it thread safe is via the known to be broken within java's JVMs Double-Checked Locking

public class A {
   private B b;

   public B getB() throws SomeException {
       if (b == null) {
            synchronized(this) {
                if (b == null) {
                    b = BCreatorFactory.createB(); // BAD -> not really thread safe -> broken
                }
            }
       }
       return b;
   }
}

What then, dear patient reader, should I do?

In other words, what is the best solution to initializing an object instance that contains a reference to an object who's creation may throw an exception?

share|improve this question
4  
It's not clear to me why you think making A's constructor throw SomeException is a bad thing here. –  Simon Nickerson Nov 24 '11 at 15:45
    
Why do you think that throwing the B's Exception is bad? –  Alfredo Osorio Nov 24 '11 at 15:46
    
What do you expect to happen when an exception is thrown? Without knowing this its hard to know what to do about it. –  Peter Lawrey Nov 24 '11 at 15:48
    
That, plus by using volatile, double-checked locking isn't as broken under JDK5+ ref1, ref2 –  Dave Newton Nov 24 '11 at 15:49
add comment

2 Answers

What's wrong with this?

public class A {
   private B b;

   public A() throws SomeException { // BAD -- *no it's not*
      b = BCreatorFactory.createB();
   }
}

There's nothing wrong with a constructor throwing an exception.

share|improve this answer
add comment

There is nothing wrong with a constructor throwing an exception. Many classes in the Java framework throw exception from the constructor. Its also fine to catch the exception inside the constructor so long as you have a way of handling and resolving the situation automatically. The point to checked exceptions in Java is so that you cannot just ignore the error condition and you have to handle it somewhere.

I throw an exception and force the calling code to handle a not properly initialized instance

The calling code will not have to deal with an improperly initialized instance, it will automatically go to the catch block where you should be doing something about the exception whether that be throwing it up, logging it, failing, etc.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.