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The following code runs like a charm before OpenMP parallelization was applied. In fact, the following code was in a state of endless loop! I'm sure that's result from my incorrect use to the OpenMP directives. Would you please show me the correct way? Thank you very much.

          #pragma omp parallel for
          for (int nY = nYTop; nY <= nYBottom; nY++)
          {   
              for (int nX = nXLeft; nX <= nXRight; nX++)
              {   
                  // Use look-up table for performance
                  dLon = theApp.m_LonLatLUT.LonGrid()[nY][nX] + m_FavoriteSVISSRParams.m_dNadirLon;
                  dLat = theApp.m_LonLatLUT.LatGrid()[nY][nX];

                  // If you don't want to use longitude/latitude look-up table, uncomment the following line
                  //NOMGeoLocate.XYToGEO(dLon, dLat, nX, nY);

                  if (dLon > 180 || dLat > 180)
                  {  
                     continue;
                  }

                  if (Navigation.GeoToXY(dX, dY, dLon, dLat, 0) > 0) 
                  {  
                     continue;
                  }

                  // Skip void data scanline
                  dY = dY - nScanlineOffset;

                  // Compute coefficients as well as its four neighboring points' values
                  nX1 = int(dX);
                  nX2 = nX1 + 1;
                  nY1 = int(dY);
                  nY2 = nY1 + 1;

                  dCx = dX - nX1;
                  dCy = dY - nY1;

                  dP1 = pIRChannelData->operator [](nY1)[nX1];
                  dP2 = pIRChannelData->operator [](nY1)[nX2];
                  dP3 = pIRChannelData->operator [](nY2)[nX1];
                  dP4 = pIRChannelData->operator [](nY2)[nX2];

                  // Bilinear interpolation
                  usNomDataBlock[nY][nX] = (unsigned short)BilinearInterpolation(dCx, dCy, dP1, dP2, dP3, dP4);
              } 
          }
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4 Answers 4

Don't nest it too deep. Usually, it would be enough to identify a good point for parallelization and get away with just one directive.

Some comments and probably the root of your problem:

      #pragma omp parallel default(shared)  // Here you open several threads ...
      {   
          #pragma omp for
          for (int nY = nYTop; nY <= nYBottom; nY++)  
          {                                          

              #pragma omp parallel shared(nY, nYBottom) // Same here ...
              {   
                  #pragma omp for
                  for (int nX = nXLeft; nX <= nXRight; nX++)
                  { 

(Conceptually) you are opening many threads, in each of them you open many threads again in the for loop. For each thread in the for loop, you open many threads again, and for each of those, you open again many in another for loop.

That's (thread (thread)*)+ in pattern matching words; there should just be thread+

Just do a single parallel for. Don't be to fine-grained, parallelize on the outer loop, each thread should run as long as possible:

#pragma omp parallel for
for (int nY = nYTop; nY <= nYBottom; nY++)
{      
    for (int nX = nXLeft; nX <= nXRight; nX++)
    {
    }
}

Avoid data and cache sharing between the threads (another reason why the threads shouldn't be too fine grained on your data).

If that's running stable and shows good speed up, you can fine tune it with different scheduling algorithms as per your OpenMP reference card.

And put your variable declarations to where you really need them. Do not overwrite what is read by sibling threads.

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#pragma omp parallel default(shared) // Here you open several threads ... { #pragma omp for // <- syntax error: you are wrong phresnel. This is totally valid way to do a parallel for loop. That pragma tells the parallel environment to be parallelized now. The combination of omp parallel and following omp for is especially useful if you need thread local allocations / initializations, although here it is not needed and doing a combined omp parallel for will certainly do it. –  Bort Nov 24 '11 at 17:10
    
and yeah to much nesting GoldenLee. I would go for the outer loop, only. You are just open another set of threads within a thread... –  Bort Nov 24 '11 at 17:20
    
@phresnel: Thank you for your detailed explanation on OpenMP usage. And sorry for my late reply for it's too late (actually I went to sleep). I have a test on the basis of your suggestion. But the result let me down. It's still in endless running! Why? Would you please give me further advice? Thank you! –  GoldenLee Nov 25 '11 at 1:38
    
@Bort: I see, that's new to me. Thanks for pointing that out. –  phresnel Nov 25 '11 at 6:14
    
don't you need to declare nX as private in the for loop parallelization? i.e: #pragma omp parallel for private(nX) –  jperelli Jun 11 at 11:48

You can also collapse several loops effectively. There are restrictions on loop's conditions: they must be independent. More than that not all compilers supports 'collapse' lexem. (As for gcc with OpenMP, it works.)

      int i,j,k;
      #pragma omp parallel for collapse(3)
      for(i=0; i<=N-1; i++)
          for(j=0; j<=N-1; j++)
              for(k=0; k<=N-1; k++)
              {
                  // something useful... 
              }
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In practice, it is usually most beneficial to parallelize the out-most loop only. Parallelizing all the inner loops may give you too many threads (though OpenMP sticks with the number of hardware execution units, when not told otherwise). And more importantly - parallelizing inner loop wil most likely create and destroy threads too often, and that's an expensive operation. Your CPU will be executing threading API calls instead of your workload.

Not really an answer, but I figured I'd share the experience.

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There are issues with write safety on all the variables assigned to in the inner loop. Every thread will try to assign values to the same variables, most likely you will get junk. For example, two threads may be updating dLon at the same time resulting in thread 1 passing thread 2's value into Navigation.GeoToXY(dX, dY, dLon, dLat, 0). Since you call other methods in the loop, those methods invoked on junk arguments may not terminate.

To resolve this, either declare local variables in the outer loop right after omp parallel for is applied or, use the private clauses like firstprivate to get OpenMP to automatically create local variables for each thread. In the case of firstprivate, it will copy the initialized global value. For example,

int dLon = 0;
#pragma omp parallel for firstprivate(dLon) // dLon = 0 for each thread
for (...)
{
    // each thread has it's own dLon variable so there's no clash in writing
    dLon = ...;
}

See more about the clauses here: https://computing.llnl.gov/tutorials/openMP/

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