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I'm working on an ajax google maps script and I need to create dynamic variable names in a for loop.

for (var i = 0; i < coords.length; ++i) {
    var marker+i = "some stuff";
}

What I want to get is: marker0, marker1, marker2 and so on. and I guess there is something wrong with marker+i

Firebug gives me this: missing ; before statement

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1  
I think you need to give a bit more context for a better answer. What do you mean by "count up var names"? Is marker defined somewhere outside the loop? – Zut Nov 24 '11 at 16:42
1  
Ya - If you search for Javascript Arrays you will get your answers,tutorials- Sometimes its just difficult to name what you want. Fair enough. – ppumkin Nov 24 '11 at 16:48
up vote 39 down vote accepted

Use an array for this.

var markers = [];
for (var i = 0; i < coords.length; ++i) {
    markers[i] = "some stuff";
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Hey i totally forgot to thank you! i got it working ;) – Philipp Bergmann Dec 8 '11 at 9:49
    
This was edited from coords.length to markers.length -- was approved before I could reject. I think that edit is wrong -- why would you loop through an empty object? – Chris Wilson Jul 9 '14 at 18:31
    
You're agree! Sorry 4 my mistake! – T30 Jul 9 '14 at 18:33
    
What if I want to use destination[1]address, destination[1]description, destination[1]name? – Pitto Sep 16 '15 at 14:34

I agree it is generally preferable to use an Array for this.

However, this can also be accomplished in JavaScript by simply adding properties to the current scope (the global scope, if top-level code; the function scope, if within a function) by simply using this – which always refers to the current scope.

for (var i = 0; i < coords.length; ++i) {
    this["marker"+i] = "some stuff";
}

You an later retrieve the stored values (if you are within the same scope as when they were set):

var foo = this.marker0;
console.log(foo); // "some stuff"

This slightly odd feature of JavaScript is rarely used (with good reason), but in certain situations it can be useful.

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4  
Why break out of the scope and throw it on the window??? That's just begging for problems later on. – Andrew Nov 24 '11 at 16:43
2  
Ya- it will work- just selecting a value later can be problematic. – ppumkin Nov 24 '11 at 16:50
1  
@shyamnathan: Use this['marker1'] or this.marker1. Or, if this is at the top-level scope, you can use window['marker1'] or window.marker1. – Todd Ditchendorf Jul 2 '14 at 23:27
1  
Needed this one and got it here. Sometimes knowing a different path is good. – ni8mr Jun 7 at 7:18
1  
This solution helped me. In my case "some stuff" is an array, so I was looking for solution without nesting arrays (just because it is easier to maintain). Thanks a lot! – jazzgot Jul 16 at 10:54

Try this

window['marker'+i] = "some stuff"; 
share|improve this answer
 var marker+i = "some stuff";

coudl be interpreted like this: create a variable named marker (undefined); then add to i; then try to assign a value to to the result of an expression, not possible. What firebug is saying is this: var marker; i = 'some stuff'; this is what firebug expects a comma after marker and before i; var is a statement and don't (apparently) accepts expressions. Not so good an explanation but i hope it helps.

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1  
Hamid, he explains why it doesn't work, this is not supposed to be a working solution. – Filip Vondrášek Aug 26 '14 at 15:14

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