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I'm relatively (more like completely) new to the world of razor, and have inevitably hit my first hurdle. I'm a web developer who is also new to the CMS Umbraco, and therefore I've been working with razor for scripting.

My problem is rather a simple one I believe; how can I split a textstring to display 4 different words/values, with commas in between?

Ideally, I would like to turn something like:

"WhyWontThisWork" into "Why, Wont, This, Work" and to possibly complicate things: "'Why', Wont, This, Work" (with the 's around the first word)

I"ve been trying with this method from another thread, but to no avail:

@foreach (string s in "1,2,3".Split(',')) {
  @: s is equal to @s<br/>
}

By trying to implement this syntax into my own script, it looks like the following, and therefore it doesn't work:

@inherits umbraco.MacroEngines.DynamicNodeContext
@{
    foreach (var x in Model.uctextstring.Split(',')) {
        @x.InnerText
    }
}
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1 Answer 1

This isn't really an issue specifically to tackle with Razor. I think the best way of doing this would be to have a dedicated method. Simple splits won't do what you want because you don't know the logical point at which to split, and I can't think of an easy Regex solution for it either. So here is a very basic example that moves through the string character by character to identify basic word boundaries:

public static IEnumerable<string> SplitString(string value)
{
  char last = char.MinValue;
  bool inWord = false;
  string word = string.Empty;

  foreach (char c in s)
  {
      if (char.IsLetter(c))
      {
          // Covers situations with apostrophised characters, e.g. 's
          if (last == '\'' && char.IsLetter(c) && inWord)
          {
              word += last;
              word += c;
              yield return word;

              word = string.Empty;
              inWord = false;
          }
          else if (char.IsUpper(c) && !inWord)
          {
              // Start of a new word.
              word += c;
              inWord = true;
          } 
          else if (char.IsUpper(c))
          {
              // Return the last word.
              yield return word;

              // Start a new string.
              word = string.Empty + c;
              inWord = true;
          }
          else
          {
              // Append to the current string.
              word += c;
          }
      } 
      else
      {
          if (c == '\'' && inWord)
          {
              // If we are at an apostrophe, set and then skip
              last = c;
              continue;
          }

          if (word.Length > 0)
          {
              // Otherwise, if we have a previous word, return.
              yield return word;

              // Clear ready for the next word.
              word = string.Empty;
              inWord = false;
          }
      }

      last = c;
  }

  // If there is one more remaining word, return it.
  if (word.Length > 0)
      yield return word;
}

Which you can join/concatentate using

string result = string.Join(", ", SplitString(sentence));

This method makes use of the compiler's ability to create a state machine when we are using yield. This is good, because we can enumerate through the character stream, and return results when we actually obtain them.

Now, this won't directly work in a Razor template, as you'd need to declare a template method. The dirty way of doing it, would be to declare a function using a Func<string, IEnumerable<string>> instance:

@{
    Func<string, IEnumerable<string>> splitter = s =>
    {
      char last = char.MinValue;
      bool inWord = false;
      string word = string.Empty;

      IList<string> words = new List<string>();

      foreach (char c in s)
      {
          if (char.IsLetter(c))
          {
              if (last == '\'' && char.IsLetter(c) && inWord)
              {
                  word += last;
                  word += c;
                  words.Add(word);

                  word = string.Empty;
                  inWord = false;
              }
              else if (char.IsUpper(c) && !inWord)
              {
                  word += c;
                  inWord = true;
              } 
              else if (char.IsUpper(c))
              {
                  words.Add(word);

                  word = string.Empty + c;
                  inWord = true;
              }
              else
              {
                  word += c;
              }
          } 
          else
          {
              if (c == '\'' && inWord)
              {
                  last = c;
                  continue;
              }

              if (word.Length > 0)
              {
                  words.Add(word);

                  word = string.Empty;
                  inWord = false;
              }
          }

          last = c;
      }

      if (word.Length > 0)
        words.Add(word);

      return words;
    };
  }

But even that is not pretty. It's not a bullet proof way of splitting the string correctly either.

share|improve this answer
    
Wow, thanks for the answer, Matthew! Just looking at the code tells me I'm definitely way out of my depth! –  mmmoustache Nov 25 '11 at 9:10
    
+1 good detail. –  amelvin Nov 27 '11 at 0:05
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