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My Class Hierarchy is thus: BaseClass (is an abstract class) then it has three subclasses that inherit from it: ArcaneWarrior, Guardian, Magi.

I want to have two non-changing values for DefaultHealth and DefaultMana that are specific to each subclass as they will all have different values for both variables.

I guess I'm just looking for the best/most efficient way to do this.

Should I just have two virtual functions in the base class to return DefaultHealth and DefaultMana, and in the subclasses hard code in the values I want?

I appreciate any insight

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2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

My vote goes to const values in the base class and a protected constructor:

class BaseClass{
  const unsigned default_health;
  const unsigned default_mana;

protected:
  BaseClass(unsigned def_hp, unsigned def_mp)
    : default_health(def_hp)
    , default_mana(def_mp)
  {
  }

public:
  // your functions...
};

class ArcaneWarrior
  : public BaseClass
{
public:
  ArcaneWarrior()
    : BaseClass(200, 50)
  {
  }

  // ...
};

This is superior to the virtual function approach in 2 ways:

  • No virtual dispatch at runtime (no overhead)
  • true const-ness (those values can't be changed, ever)

Virtual functions don't give you const-ness, see this example:

class BaseClass{
public:
  virtual unsigned GetDefaultHealth() const = 0;
  virtual unsigned GetDefaultMana() const = 0;
  // ...
};

class ArcaneWarrior
  : public BaseClass
{
  unsigned default_health, default_mana;

public:
  virtual unsigned GetDefaultHealth() const{
    return default_health;
  }

  virtual unsigned GetDefaultHealth() const{
    return default_mana;
  }

  void SetDefaults(unsigned health, unsigned mana){
    default_health = health;
    default_mana = mana;
  }
};
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They only give you constness if you allow them to. Why should he add SetDefaults to the interface if wants them to be const. His current approach with a hard-coded value returned by a virtual function is also truely const (you cannot get more const than a literal). And if you don't like hard-coded values, you can still return the value of a static const variable of the sub-class/method/file. But I agree with the first advantage. –  Christian Rau Nov 24 '11 at 18:59
    
Dont the variables need to be protected too? –  Seth Carnegie Nov 26 '11 at 4:10
    
@Seth: They don't need to per se, only if you want the derived classes to actually access them. But in this case, it's only allowed because they are const. If they weren't, you'd be better off writing protected accessors. –  Xeo Nov 26 '11 at 4:23

Yes, that's really the best and most straightforward way to do it. With virtual functions, you get both the "non-changing"-ness you want, along with being able to determine that value through a pointer (or reference) to the base class without knowing the exact type.

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