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I'm using for-loops to iterate over two-dimensional list:

def itr(lpic, lH, lW, x, y):
    '''lpic=2D-Array; lH=Row_count; lW=Column_count;'''
    stack = []
    range_x = range(x-1, x+2)
    range_y = range(y-1, y+2)
    append = stack.append
    for i in range_x:
                if 0<=i<lH:#i is a valid index *Updated
                    for j in range_y:
                        if (0<=j<lW) and (lpic[i][j]=="0"):
                            lpic[i][j] = "1"
                            append([i, j])
    return stack

I'd like to know if there is a better way to do the same with Python2.5.

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

There are two simple optimizations for your code:

  1. Use xrange instead for range. This will prevent from generation two temporary lists.

  2. Use min and max in parameters for xrange to omit 'if' in outer loop. So you code will look like that:

 
    def itr(lpic, lH, lW, x, y):
    '''lpic=2D-Array; lH=Row_count; lW=Column_count;'''
    stack = []
    range_x = xrange(max(0,x-1), min(lH,x+2))
    range_y = xrange(max(0,y-1), min(lW,y+2))
    append = stack.append
    for i in range_x:
      for j in range_y:
          if lpic[i][j]=="0":
              lpic[i][j] = "1"
              append([i, j])
    return stack

This will slightly increase performance.

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+1 for xrange. Thank you! –  Sathvik Nov 24 '11 at 18:30
    
I heard xrange is deprecated in Python3. –  Sathvik Nov 25 '11 at 12:41
1  
@Sathvik: range in Python3 behaves like xrange in Python2. list(range(...)) is the Python3 equivalent of range in Python2. Consequently, the name xrange has been removed from Python3, but not the behavior. –  unutbu Dec 1 '11 at 3:24
    
Thank you, @unutbu –  Sathvik Dec 2 '11 at 13:50
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Not really. In Python 2.6 if you wanted to compact your code a little, you could use itertools.product() to turn it into a single for loop, but the general efficiency wouldn't change at all - you'd still have N*M iterations of the loop.

import itertools

def itr(lpic, lH, lW, x, y):
    '''lpic=2D-Array; lH=Row_count; lW=Column_count;'''
    stack = []
    range_x = range(x-1, x+2)
    range_y = range(y-1, y+2)
    append = stack.append
    for i,j in itertools.product(range_x, range_y):
        if 0 <= i < lh and 0 <= j < lW and lpic[i][j]=="0":
            lpic[i][j] = "1"
            append([i, j])
    return stack
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1  
itertools.product is in 2.6+. –  Avaris Nov 24 '11 at 17:58
    
@Avaris - true. :) Well then, the first sentence stands. :) –  Amber Nov 24 '11 at 18:00
2  
Right :). Also, maybe you can shorten the if conditions to: 0<=i<lH and 0<=j<lW and lpic[i][j]=="0". –  Avaris Nov 24 '11 at 18:06
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