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Is there c# code that accept only positive numbers and does not accept negative numbers?

Like

Console.WriteLine("Write number"); 
Console.ReadLine();

i read tutorials but still not helped

and now i don't have any idea how to prevent negative numbers.

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What do mean by prevent? Check the number by yourself. –  VMAtm Nov 25 '11 at 5:46

6 Answers 6

To make it user friendly a loop is often good, that continues asking for input until a valid input is entered. TryParse returns false if a non valid input was entered. When valid input is entered TryParse returns true and number holds the value. Using uint will prevent negative numbers from being entered.

uint number;

do
{
  Console.WriteLine("Write non-negative number");
  string strNumber = Console.ReadLine();
}
while(!uint.TryParse(strNumber, number));
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You have to check it manually yourself...

do {
   //Read number into variable   

   if (number < 0) {
     Console.WriteLine("Number cannot be negative");
   }
}while(number < 0)

It works by reading the number, then checking if its negative. If it is then it warns the user and the loop forces them to retry.

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Thanks, that what i was looking for, but "Number cannot be negative" not stop, is just come without stopping when i type negative number, i want it to come one time. –  CsharpNoob Nov 24 '11 at 20:13
    
Sorry I wasn't clearer. You need to replace my comment with the code you use to grab the number. That way when the if (number < 0) gets hit, it re-asks for the number again. –  TheCapn Nov 24 '11 at 20:57

Something different to uint.TryParse would be the int.TryParse(string, NumberStyles, IFormatProvider, out int) overload which lets you specify even more what a valid input should look like:

string str = ...
int value;
if (int.TryParse(str, NumberStyles.AllowLeadingWhite | NumberStyles.AllowTrailingWhite, CultureInfo.CurrentCulture, out value))
{
    // ...
}

The normal int.TryParse also includes NumberStyles.AllowLeadingSign which is what you not want.

uint may be unavailable if there are strict guidelines for CLS compliant code.

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There's uint but that's not what you want since the user could still type a negative number.

After you parse the string and make sure it's an integer, just take the absolute value by calling Math.Abs() and you'll be done.

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If you are trying to prevent users from entering negative numbers in data entry fields, you have several choices.

  • One is to not permit entering anything but digits, commas and periods.
  • Another is to drop the characters in your code after you read them from the data entry.

The way to handle this is different among different kinds of applications -- console, WinForms/WPF or website.

For example, on an ASP.Net web page, you can use the validation controls to allow only digits to be entered. This is one way to do that:

<asp:CompareValidator
    ControlToValidate="AmountTextbox"
    Operator="GreaterThanEqual"
    Type="Currency"   'needed this to cover amts with & w/o decimals
    ValueToCompare="0"
    ErrorMessage="The Amount cannot be negative."
    Display="None"
    Runat="server" />
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Console.ReadLine() will not limit what the user can enter on the command line. You will need to validate the input yourself; probably the simplest way to do this is as described by BoltClock. But, you need to try - catch his code to catch the invalid cast exception in the case the value is not a uint.

This will not only make sure that the users input is an integer, but also that it is positive. Otherwise you will have to perform a 2 part check; first, is the users input an integer, second, is that integer greater than 0.

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