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The idea would be to help determine the optimum stack size for a given Java application.

One thing that could be done with this information create a range-table of stack sizes which the threads could modify as they exit and which could be dumped periodically and at application exit.

EDIT: This is in the context of running on customer machines with real workloads which I can't get profiler access to.

EDIT2: In response to one answer, at (IIRC) 256Kb per thread, I have wondered for a while now how close that is to the reality of what's needed (I also wonder if this question might be not very relevant because perhaps stack space is allocated on demand). We have an application server which is based on message passing and highly threaded and runs on everything from an ARM handheld to octo-core Linux, to midrange and mainframes - it would be good to have a feeling for where (and if) we can trade stack space for heap on systems with many message handlers.

There are some similar questions which are of interest, but they are native/os-specific:

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Just get yourself a 64-bit platform... –  Tom Hawtin - tackline May 5 '09 at 18:16
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@Tom: Sure... and I'll just buy one for each of my customers along with 8 Gigs of RAM so I don't have to think about the software I design and write. –  Lawrence Dol May 5 '09 at 18:29
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4 Answers

Stack memory will be hard to obtain.

Best you can do, and quite easily, is JVM memory usage via MemoryMXBean.

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Is there anything better? –  Pacerier Feb 11 '12 at 20:49
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Use JConsole-- you likely already have it: http://java.sun.com/j2se/1.5.0/docs/guide/management/jconsole.html http://openjdk.java.net/tools/svc/jconsole/

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I had thought about that (actually JVisualVM is better), and I use JProfiler... but this is in the context of running on customer machines with real workloads which I can't get profiler access to. –  Lawrence Dol May 5 '09 at 18:21
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I think you can do that with the brand new VisualVM too.

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Per my comment to Cuga's answer from May 5: "I had thought about that (actually JVisualVM is better), and I use JProfiler... but this is in the context of running on customer machines with real workloads which I can't get profiler access to." –  Lawrence Dol May 14 '09 at 17:30
    
Interesting - JVisualVM is bundled with Java 6 - I didn't know that it is also distributed via the web. The plugins look quite useful. –  Lawrence Dol May 14 '09 at 17:31
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You may use the Runtime class to monitor the JVM memmory like this.

Runtime rt = Runtime.getRuntime();
System.out.println((rt.freeMemory() / 1024) + "/" + (rt.maxMemory() / 1024) + " kB");

Or you may use JConsole, JVisualVM e JInfo. You may get more information about these tools Here:

http://java.sun.com/developer/technicalArticles/J2SE/monitoring/

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That doesn't tell us the stack size. –  devoured elysium Feb 23 '12 at 20:51
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