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I am trying to merge:

to_graph <- structure(list(Teacher = c("BS", "BS", "FA"
), Level = structure(c(2L, 1L, 1L), .Label = c("BE", "AE", "ME", 
"EE"), class = "factor"), Count = c(2L, 25L, 28L)), .Names = c("Teacher", 
"Level", "Count"), row.names = c(NA, 3L), class = "data.frame")

and

graph_avg <- structure(list(Teacher = structure(c(1L, 1L, 2L), .Label = c("BS", 
"FA"), class = "factor"), Count.Fraction = c(0.0740740740740741, 
0.925925925925926, 1)), .Names = c("Teacher", "Count.Fraction"
), row.names = c(NA, -3L), class = "data.frame")

with merge(to_graph, graph_avg, by="Teacher"), but instead of getting what I expect (3 rows), I get:

  Teacher Level Count Count.Fraction
1      BS    AE     2     0.07407407
2      BS    AE     2     0.92592593
3      BS    BE    25     0.07407407
4      BS    BE    25     0.92592593
5      FA    BE    28     1.00000000

Any ideas? Thank you!

share|improve this question
    
Sorry, 3 rows. I was thinking of another dataset. –  Jeff Erickson Nov 24 '11 at 23:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 6 down vote accepted

Not sure what you're trying to accomplish. merge is doing what it's supposed to here.

Let's look at all of the data.frames

graph_avg
  Teacher Count.Fraction
1      BS     0.07407407
2      BS     0.92592593
3      FA     1.00000000

to_graph
  Teacher Level Count
1      BS    AE     2
2      BS    BE    25
3      FA    BE    28

merge(to_graph, graph_avg)
  Teacher Level Count Count.Fraction
1      BS    AE     2     0.07407407
2      BS    AE     2     0.92592593
3      BS    BE    25     0.07407407
4      BS    BE    25     0.92592593
5      FA    BE    28     1.00000000

Now, if I'm going to merge those I've got to look and see what's common and what I'm going to get for an outcome. Teacher, you have that in both. But, if I try to merge on just Teacher what do I do? There's no unique identifier for BS and it appears twice in both data.frames. If it appeared once in one of them it would be easy to solve. So, I go can check and say, OK, I've got a unique identifier in one data.frame, level... that would do it... and go and make something that doesn't lose any of your data. merge is really handy for situations where you've got a small data.frame, say with each teacher in it once, and it has the teacher's age, or sex there. You could merge that into your another data.frame with repeated measures on teacher and every time the teacher appears you'll also know those. But for what you're doing it's not the right tool.

merge is not what you want here. If these are really your data.frames use cbind instead.

cbind(to_graph, graph_avg$Count.Fraction)

  Teacher Level Count Count.Fraction
1      BS    AE     2     0.07407407
2      BS    BE    25     0.92592593
3      FA    BE    28     1.00000000

That's probably what you were looking for.

share|improve this answer
    
However, the downside of the cbind() solution is that you need to be absolutely 100% sure that the order of to_graph$Teacher and graph_avg$Teacher is identical, otherwise you'll end up connecting the wrong numbers to teachers! In this toy example it is trivial, but in a larger data set this can be easily overlooked. So, although I value your explanation of merge()'s approach, I would also expect that there's a magical combination of merge() parameters that does not result in the duplication of rows. So far, I cannot find it. So I guess you're right in claiming this is out of `merge –  Paul Lemmens Nov 25 '11 at 14:29
    
What you're asking for has no solution. Please ask for something more specific, and that could be solved algorithmically. You need a way to identify unique teachers in at least one data.frame, otherwise the problem isn't solvable, unless you use order... and then only if the data.frames are the same length. This isn't an issue with the merge command, it's an issue of logic. If you're telling me that I couldn't rely on order then I couldn't merge your data together at all without more information. –  John Nov 25 '11 at 16:21
    
+1 @John, I agree with your analysis on why merge can't work with the data as provided. However, I believe the OP should do the analysis differently, as I suggest in my answer. –  Andrie Nov 25 '11 at 17:00

Since it's quite obvious that one of your datasets is derived from the other, I would suggest you don't need a merge at all, but find a way of doing the analysis in such a way that all of the data remains intact.

For example, use ddply in package plyr to derive one set from the other. Note how this result contains all of the information you need:

> library(plyr)
> ddply(to_graph, .(Teacher), transform, Count.Fraction=Count/sum(Count))

  Teacher Level Count Count.Fraction
1      BS    AE     2     0.07407407
2      BS    BE    25     0.92592593
3      FA    BE    28     1.00000000

To answer your question about merge. A merge in R is similar to a database join. To join two tables, you need to be certain that you can match the primary key in both tables. The primary key in your case is the combination of Teacher and Level. Since the Level column doesn't exist in your second data.frame, a merge is impossible.

The only way to recover this situation is to add the missing bit of the primary key back to the data. Assuming that the data is sorted in exactly the same order, you can do this with cbind and then do the merge:

> merge(to_graph, cbind(graph_avg, Level=to_graph$Level))
  Teacher Level Count Count.Fraction
1      BS    AE     2     0.07407407
2      BS    BE    25     0.92592593
3      FA    BE    28     1.00000000
share|improve this answer
    
Good catch on seeing where Count.Fraction came from. I didn't even bother assessing that. Although, with that known then merge would work with another column copied, either Count or Level. –  John Nov 25 '11 at 17:05
    
@John Adding Count as a primary key will work with the sample data, but wouldn't generalise - what happens if the Count is the same for two different Levels? –  Andrie Nov 25 '11 at 17:10

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