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So I've been given a "similarity measure" to use but no information. The similarity measure is called euclidean distance squared, or the sum of squared distances, and I have this one formula:

D2 =  Σ(I(x,y) – I’(x,y))^2 

Wikipedia tells me this:

d(p,q) = (p1 − q1)^2 + (p2 − q2)^2 + ... + (pi − qi)^2 + ... + (pn − qn)^2

I have a stereo image pair, that is two images of the same subject, one from a left eye view, one from a right eye view. I can extract pixel information from corresponding co-ordinates in the left and right pictures:

private double euclidDistSquared(BufferedImage leftRegion, BufferedImage rightRegion) {
    double temp = 0;
    double ssd = 0;
    Raster left = leftRegion.getData();
    Raster right = rightRegion.getData();

    for(int x = 0; x < leftRegion.getWidth();  x++) {
        for(int y = 0; y < leftRegion.getHeight(); y++) {
            temp = left.getSampleDouble(x,y,0) - right.getSampleDouble(x,y,0);
            temp *= temp;
            ssd += temp;
        }
    }
    ssd = 1/ssd;
    return ssd;
}

Is what I do afterwards correct? That first temp line is the extraction and subtraction of the pixel values at the corresponding co-ordinates, yet some of what I've seen online would suggest that I want to subtract my x and y values separately (how would I even do that?!). Also, the value I get for ssd in the end is something very very small like 3.792346286724133E-6 for example, does that even make sense?

EDITED for more information.

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1  
How can a number be ridiculous? –  ypercube Nov 24 '11 at 22:50

1 Answer 1

up vote 7 down vote accepted

That code correctly calculates the square of the Euclidean separation.

Presumably it is a small number because the sample values have small magnitude. There's absolutely no reason not to expect such a value. Only you can know what the actual value means and what should be done with it.


As a matter of style, I would prefer for a variable to hold the same logical value for its lifetime. In this code you write ssd = 1/ssd which grates slightly. You are using ssd to mean sum of squared distances, but when you write 1/ssd, that is no longer the sum of squared distances, it's the similarity measure.

I'd write it like this:

private double similarityMeasure(BufferedImage leftRegion, BufferedImage rightRegion) {
    double ssd = 0;
    Raster left = leftRegion.getData();
    Raster right = rightRegion.getData();

    for(int x = 0; x < leftRegion.getWidth();  x++) {
        for(int y = 0; y < leftRegion.getHeight(); y++) {
            double diff = left.getSampleDouble(x,y,0) - right.getSampleDouble(x,y,0);
            ssd += diff*diff;
        }
    }
    return 1/ssd;
}
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