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This is a question of curiosity about the reasons behind the way foreach is implemented within PHP.

Consider:

$arr = array(1,2,3);
foreach ($arr as $x) echo current($arr) . PHP_EOL;

which will output:

2
2
2

I understand that foreach rewinds array pointers to the beginning; however, why does it then increment it only once? What is happening inside the magic box?? Is this just an (ugly) artefact?


Thanks @NickC -- for anyone else curious about zval and refcount, you can read up on the basics here

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2  
Whats with the echo current($arr)? You are not using $arr in the foreach loop. foreach($arr as $x) echo current($arr).PHP_EOL; –  Krister Andersson Nov 24 '11 at 23:07
1  
Ha -- yes I was trying to optimize my loop for pretty-ness sake, but then took out a critical piece! –  jlb Nov 24 '11 at 23:08
2  
foreach operates on a copy of the array. I'm not sure why it alters the array pointer at all actually. –  Boann Nov 24 '11 at 23:15
4  
I'd expected it to produce 1 1 1 as i thought it would operate on a copy. But then i reread de.php.net/manual/en/control-structures.foreach.php and http://nikic.github.com/2011/11/11/PHP-Internals-When-does-foreach-copy.html but than the output should have been 1 2 3 or 1 1 1 but not 2 2 2. Very nice question! –  edorian Nov 24 '11 at 23:22
4  
This is not a duplicate. The linked question is "I did array stuff inside foreach and everything breaks?!? make it go away" and this is "I want a technical explanation of the inner workings of PHP regarding foreach loop behavior" –  edorian Nov 24 '11 at 23:38

3 Answers 3

up vote 15 down vote accepted

Right before the first iteration the $array is "soft copied" for use in foreach. This means that no actual copy is done, but only the refcount of the zval of $array is increased to 2.

On the first iteration:

  1. The value is fetched into $x.
  2. The internal array pointer is moved to the next element, i.e. now points to 2.
  3. current is called with $array passed by reference. Due to the reference PHP cannot share the zval with the loop anymore and it needs to be separated ("hard copied").

On the following iterations the $array zval thus isn't anymore related the the foreach zval anymore. Thus its array pointer isn't modified anymore and current always returns the same element.

By the way, I have written a small summary on foreach copying behavior. It might be of interest in the context, but it does not directly relate to the issue as it talks mostly about hard copying.

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1  
On first iteration: reset + next. That's documented. But tried to fool that by iteration by ref and using reset() inside the loop but was not able to. I guess it's a protection against that. –  hakre Nov 24 '11 at 23:29
    
How does the additional parenthesis not cause a parse error? –  Mark Tomlin Nov 24 '11 at 23:56
    
@MarkTomlin It wouldn't because foreach would then just treat it as an expression instead of a variable. I'm not exactly sure why hakre added it to the answer though. –  NikiC Nov 25 '11 at 0:05
    
I think the refcount is actually increased to 3 because of $arr inside the foreach-head (foreach ($arr .... –  Philippe Gerber Nov 25 '11 at 0:14
1  
I think you can narrow the quest for that unexpected/undefined behaviour down to changes between PHP 5.2.2 and 5.2.4 - Might have something to do with all the references about Fixed bug #41372 (Internal pointer of source array resets during array copying). - Before that all versions returned 1 1 1 for OPs example. –  mario Nov 25 '11 at 0:36

See how interesting, if we change the code just a little bit:

$arr = array(1,2,3);
foreach ($arr as &$x) echo current($arr) . PHP_EOL;

We got this output:

2
3

Some interesting references:

http://nikic.github.com/2011/11/11/PHP-Internals-When-does-foreach-copy.html

http://blog.golemon.com/2007/01/youre-being-lied-to.html

Now, try this:

$arr = array(1,2,3);
foreach ($arr as $x) { $arr2 = $arr; echo current($arr2) . PHP_EOL; }

Output:

2
3
1

This is very curious indeed.

And what about this:

$arr = array(1,2,3);
foreach ($arr as $x) { $arr2 = $arr; echo current($arr) . ' / ' . current($arr2) . PHP_EOL; }
echo PHP_EOL;
foreach ($arr as $x) { $arr2 = $arr; echo current($arr2) . ' / ' . current($arr2) . PHP_EOL; }

Output:

2 / 2
2 / 2
2 / 2

2 / 2
3 / 3
1 / 1

It seems what happens is just as written in NickC answer, plus the fact that when passing an array as an argument to current function, as it is passed by reference, something inside there does modify the array passed as argument to it...

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@Gordon No problem! :-) –  J. Bruni Nov 25 '11 at 0:08

This is the results of your code opcode analysis with php 5.3.

See this example : http://php.net/manual/en/internals2.opcodes.fe-reset.php

number of ops: 15 compiled vars: !0 = $arr, !1 = $x

line     # *  op                           fetch          ext  return  operands
---------------------------------------------------------------------------------
   2     0  >   INIT_ARRAY                                       ~0      1
   1      ADD_ARRAY_ELEMENT                                ~0      2
   2      ADD_ARRAY_ELEMENT                                ~0      3
   3      ASSIGN                                                   !0, ~0
   3     4    > FE_RESET                                   $2      !0, ->13
   5  > > FE_FETCH                                         $3      $2, ->13
   6  >   ZEND_OP_DATA                                             
   7      ASSIGN                                                   !1, $3
   8      SEND_REF                                                 !0
   9      DO_FCALL                                      1          'current'
  10      CONCAT                                           ~6      $5, '%0A'
  11      ECHO                                                     ~6
  12    > JMP                                                      ->5
  13  >   SWITCH_FREE                                              $2
  14    > RETURN                                                   1

See NikiC's answer for details, but you see at line #8 that !0 never change in the loop.(5-12)

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