Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am trying to get started with Google Go and the documentation at http://golang.org is very good. What I did not find in the documentation is the difference between functions and methods. I was googling, but I did not find a brief explanation what the difference is.

As far as I understand at the moment: functions are "global", which means I do not have to import a package to use functions, they are always there. Methods are bound to packages. Is this correct?

share|improve this question
add comment

1 Answer 1

up vote 12 down vote accepted

As far as I understand at the moment: functions are "global", which means I do not have to import a package to use functions, they are always there. Methods are bound to packages. Is this correct?

No, that's not correct. There are just a couple of functions from the builtin package which are always available. Everything else needs to be imported.

The term "method" came up with object-oriented programming. In an OOP language (like C++ for example) you can define a "class" which encapsulates data and functions which belong together. Those functions inside a class are called "methods" and you need an instance of that class to call such a method.

In Go, the terminology is basically the same, although Go isn't an OOP language in the classical meaning. In Go, a function which takes a receiver is usually called a method (probably just because people are still used to the terminology of OOP).

So, for example:

func MyFunction(a, b int) int {
  return a + b
}
// Usage:
// MyFunction(1, 2)

but

type MyInteger int
func (a MyInteger) MyMethod(b int) int {
  return a + b
}
// Usage:
// var x MyInteger = 1
// x.MyMethod(2)
share|improve this answer
1  
I wouldn't say that "Go isn't an OOP language". Go IMHO just favors composition over inheritance so much that it provides extra syntatic sugar for the former and has gotten rid of the latter completely. –  Tobias Nov 25 '11 at 21:39
1  
I'm not sure about that. Imho, part of the OOP paradigm is also subclassing + type hierarchies. That's just not possible with Go (luckily!). Sure, Go provides other ways (i.e. embedding) to solve similar problems, but they are no 1:1 replacement. But let's stop the terminology-bikeshedding :D –  tux21b Nov 25 '11 at 22:52
1  
Thanks, I finally got it! A missing piece was, that methods are always used in conjunction with a type. –  Dominik Obermaier Nov 29 '11 at 12:12
    
@tux21b thank you for the examples. One problem, your method contains an invalid operation: a + b (mismatched types MyInteger and int). In order for this to work you would need to cast either a to be an int or b to be a MyInteger. For example: return int(a) + b or return a + MyInteger(b). In the second case, you would need to change the return value type in the method signature to be MyInteger instead of int. playground –  SunSparc Feb 11 at 21:38
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.