Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In my program I'm facing another difficulty (I store them all and ask many problems in a burts :P). What I do have is a functor - those functors ae all inherited from DuplicateFn - which has a virtual operator() and each child is expected to write it's version of that.

Now one of the childs - called merge - may not succeed, in which case it should try a fallback method. Currently that class thus looks like:

class MergeFn : public DuplicateFn {
public:
    MergeFn() : FallBack(new SkipFn())
    {
    }
    MergeFn(GMProject const* Out, GMProject const* In, DuplicateFn* f) 
        : DuplicateFn(Out, In), FallBack(f)
    {
    }
    virtual void operator() (GMProject::pTree& tOut, const GMProject::pTree& tIn) const {
        if (!GMProject::isMergeable(tOut.GetName())) {
            (*FallBack)(tOut, tIn); //virtual table resolves this to the correct class
        } else {
        }
    }
private:
    std::shared_ptr<DuplicateFn> FallBack;
};

I think the problem is clearly visible already here - In the non-default constructor, this method seizes ownership of the given parameter. - This is not what I want: it should copy that parameter and keep ownership of that.
Now I tried , FallBack(new DuplicateFn(f)) However this won't work either - as now there is a compile error that it tries to instantiate an object from a class with pure virtual methods.

So how can I do this? - Do I have to specify a specific constructor for each type? - Just to copy it corectly? Or do I have to go through RTTI? I hope there's a better approach than those 2.

edit To show how mergeFn gets initialized (and used):

std::unique_ptr<detail::DuplicateFn> foo;
foo.reset(new detail::MergeFn(this, &Other, DuplicateFns.at(HandleDuplicate)));

DuplicateFns is a map which helps converting user inputs (string) towards function-pointers. - Or as it is now, pointers to objects of a subtype from DuplicateFn (pointer type is DuplicateFn* )

This is then used as a call-back method

ProjectTree.combine_if(tree, &SimilarTreeValue, foo.get());

Which combines 2 trees into one - when SimilarTreeValue returns true, the entry is considered a duplicate. If the entry is a leaf the 3rd parameter is called - the functor we're talking about :).

share|improve this question
add comment

3 Answers 3

You can use the constructor of shared_ptr which takes a custom destructor and pass an empty function for it. So for example.

void dontDelete(DuplicateFn *pFn ) {
  // Do nothing!
  }

class MergeFn : public DuplicateFn { 
public: 
    MergeFn() : FallBack(new SkipFn()) 
    { 
    }

    MergeFn(GMProject const* Out, GMProject const* In, DuplicateFn* f)  
        : DuplicateFn(Out, In), FallBack(f, dontDelete) 
    { 
    }

    virtual void operator() (GMProject::pTree& tOut, const GMProject::pTree& tIn) const { 
        if (!GMProject::isMergeable(tOut.GetName())) { 
            (*FallBack)(tOut, tIn); //virtual table resolves this to the correct class 
        } else { 
        } 
    }

private: 
    std::shared_ptr<DuplicateFn> FallBack; 
}; 
share|improve this answer
    
"You can use the constructor of shared_ptr which takes a custom destructor and pass an empty function for it." whenever I read this, I think "trying to get out of a design problem with a cheap trick will not do it". This is yet another example of that. –  curiousguy Nov 25 '11 at 2:43
add comment

The easiest solution (in my view) is to change the signature of the constructor to require a shared pointer already:

MergeFn(GMProject const * Out,
        GMProject const * In,
        std::shared_ptr<DuplicateFn> f) /* ... */

The second option is to endow your entire class hierarchy with clone() functions:

struct Base
{
  virtual Base * clone() const { return new Base(*this); }
};

struct Der1 : Base
{
  virtual Der1 * clone() const { return new Der1(*this); }
};

Then you can initialize FallBack(f->clone()).

Personally I'd go with the first version, and I'd also check whether it isn't feasible to replace the shared pointer by a unique pointer.

share|improve this answer
    
"replace the shared pointer by a unique pointer." why? –  curiousguy Nov 25 '11 at 2:43
    
@curiousguy: unique_ptr is a much lighter-weight (no dynamic allocation, no virtual dispatch). Only use shared_ptr if you really have to share ownership. –  Kerrek SB Nov 25 '11 at 2:51
    
"Only use shared_ptr if you really have to share ownership." I see at least two owners here: the caller and the callee. A function argument of type unique_ptr implies a transfer of ownership. What if the caller still wants ownership? –  curiousguy Nov 25 '11 at 3:08
    
Which caller? We don't know that. All I can see is the constructor argument. It's entirely possible that only one single owner is required. Anyway, only the OP can decide that, since we don't know anything about the context. –  Kerrek SB Nov 25 '11 at 3:11
    
@KerrekSB hmm, but I really need to "transfer" ownership - or at least I need to be sure the outside world can't touch the pointer. However at the same time, the outside world shouldn't be changed by this class either. –  paul23 Nov 25 '11 at 8:57
show 1 more comment

new DuplicateFn(f)

that will only slice the functor f.

You need a clone function:

#include <typeinfo>
#include <cassert>

template <class T>
// runtime checked clone function
// T::do_clone() must be accessible to checked_clone
T *checked_clone (const T* that) {
    T *p = that->do_clone();
    assert (typeid (*p) == typeid (*that));
    return p;
}

// clone for an abstract class
#define IMPLEMENT_CLONE_ABSTRACT(Class) \
    friend Class *checked_clone<Class> (const Class* that); \
 \
public: \
    Class *clone_naked() const { \
        return checked_clone (this); \
    } \
    unique_ptr<Class> clone_unique() const { \
        return unique_ptr<Class> (checked_clone (this)); \
    } \     \
private: \
    virtual Class *do_clone() const = 0; \
/* end of IMPLEMENT_CLONE_ABSTRACT */

class Base {
    IMPLEMENT_CLONE_ABSTRACT(Base)
};

// clone for a concrete class
#define IMPLEMENT_CLONE_CONCRETE(Class) \
    friend Class *checked_clone<Class> (const Class* that); \
 \
public: \
    Class *clone_naked() const { \
        return checked_clone (this); \
    } \
    unique_ptr<Class> clone_unique() const { \
        return unique_ptr<Class> (checked_clone (this)); \
    } \     \
 \
private: \
    virtual Class *do_clone() const {  \
        return new Class (*this); \
    } \
/* end of IMPLEMENT_CLONE_CONCRETE */

class Derived : public Base {
    IMPLEMENT_CLONE_CONCRETE(Derived)
};
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.