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Let's have the following:

public interface IOne {
    UInt64 Id { get; }
    Int16 Size { get; }
}

public interface ITwo {
    UInt64 OneId { get; }
    Int16 Color { get; }
}

As explained here the way to reuse a linq expression is to write something like this:

public static Expression<Func<IOne, bool>> MyWhereExpression( int value ){
    return (o) => (o.Size > value);
}

int v = 5;
IQueryable<IOne> records = from one in s.Query<IOne>()
                                        .Where(MyWhereExpression(v))
                           select one;

When I want to do the same with two tables I encounter a problem.

The expression:

public static Expression<Func<IOne, ITwo, bool>> MyWhereExpression2(int color ) {
    return (one,two) => (one.Id == two.OneId) && (two.Color > color );
}

Linq 1:

int color = 100;
IQueryable<IOne> records = from one in s.Query<IOne>()
                           from two in s.Query<ITwo>()
                                        .Where(MyWhereExpression2(color))
                           select one;

This doesn't work as .Where sticks to only the 2nd from.

Linq 2:

int color = 100;
IQueryable<IOne> records = (from one in s.Query<IOne>()
                            from two in s.Query<ITwo>()
                            select new { one, two })
                           .Where(MyWhereExpression2(color));

This results in

Argument 2: cannot convert from 'Expression<System.Func<IOne,ITwo,bool>>' to 'System.Func<AnonymousType#1,int,bool>'

I understand the error message about the AnonymousType, but I cannot figure out how to write the query.

The reason why I want to use an expression rather than just write

where (one.Id == two.OneId) && (two.Color > color ) 

directly in the linq query is because I want to reuse this expression in multiple linq queries.

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3 Answers 3

There may be a more elegant solution that escapes me at the moment, but you could just use Tuple<IOne, ITwo> instead of the anonymous type:

static Expression<Func<Tuple<IOne, ITwo>, bool>> MyWhereExpression2(int color) {
    return t => (t.Item1.Id == t.Item2.OneId) && (t.Item2.Color > color);
}

int color = 100;
IQueryable<IOne> records = (from one in s.Query<IOne>()
                            from two in s.Query<ITwo>()
                            select Tuple.Create(one, two))
                            .Where(MyWhereExpression2(color))
                            .Select(t => t.Item1);

UPDATE: I probably answered too quickly above as that won't work with Linq to SQL since the call to Tuple.Create cannot be translated to SQL. To work with Linq to SQL, the only solution I see at the moment is to create a named type:

class Pair
{
    public IOne One { get; set; }
    public ITwo Two { get; set; }
}

static Expression<Func<Pair, bool>> MyWhereExpression2(int color) {
    return p => (p.One.Id == p.Two.OneId) && (p.Two.Color > color);
}

int color = 100;
IQueryable<IOne> records = (from one in s.Query<IOne>()
                            from two in s.Query<ITwo>()
                            select new Pair { One = one, Two = two })
                            .Where(MyWhereExpression2(color))
                            .Select(p => p.One);
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It looks that .Zip() is not supported by LINQ to SQL either. –  Teudimundo Nov 25 '11 at 7:22
    
Nick, this is a great answer. Unfortunately, event the updated variant will not work with NHibernate (3.2.0). Its linq to SQL provider will throw an exception. –  Tymek Nov 29 '11 at 2:37
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First of all why do you have two tables with same set of fields? Ideally database design should avoid same field names in different tables. Design should use inheritance. Common fields should move into base class and EF let's you create table per hierarchy, that should resolve your problem.

If you create your model with Table Per Hierarchy then you will not need interface, and your linq queries can use shared filter expressions.

There is no way to achieve what you are asking unless you sit down and write a complex reflection based method that will clone your expression from one type to another type.

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Where did I say I have two tables with the same set of fields? I want to reuse the expression for a count query and then for a query which pulls the data. I also don't understand how interfaces affect linq queries. –  Tymek Nov 29 '11 at 1:32
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up vote 1 down vote accepted

Answering my own question...

After some experiments (including Nick Guerrera's original answer) I took another approach - instead of trying to reuse the expression I reuse the whole linq. However, it still required creating a container struct.

struct Pair {
    public IOne One { get; set; }
    public ITwo Two { get; set; }
    public Pair(IOne one, ITwo two) : this() {
        One = one;
        Two = two;
    }
}


public IQueryable<Pair> Get(ISession s, int color) {
            return from one in s.Query<IOne>()
                   from two in s.Query<ITwo>()
                   where (one.Id == two.OneId) && (two.Color > color)
                   select new Pair(one, two);
        }

Now I can call

Get(s, color).Count();

and

var records = (from data in Get(s, color) select data).Take(2000);

etc.

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