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I have a parrallelized C++ program that does brute force optimization. For some reason I get diminishing returns per core up to ~6 cores, at which point I hit a wall where further cores add ~no speed. This is consistent when run on an 8 or 16 core machine.

When I run strace -f ./progname I get a whole ton of the following that occur specifically during the multithreaded section of the program: [pid 2646] mprotect(0x7ffe7c030000, 4096, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE) = 0

and a few of these that occur one after the other: [pid 2645] mprotect(0x7ffe78030000, 4096, PROT_READ|PROT_WRITE <unfinished ...> -- [pid 2646] <... mprotect resumed> ) = 0

Their not always from the same pid though.

When I decrease the number of cores I get fewer of the above messages, and at 2 or 3 cores I don't get any.

The only thing I can guess is that maybe it has to do with the massive quantity of vector allocations and accessing that gets done in each thread. I'm not using any other memory management libraries if that's relevant.

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I have a parrallelized C++ program that does brute force optimization. For some reason I get diminishing returns per core up to ~6 cores, at which point I hit a wall where further cores add ~no speed. This is consistent when run on an 8 or 16 core machine.

Can you describe the algorithm? Lots of computation algorithms are memory bound.

Try profiling your application with oprofile, perf, or if those aren't possible, gprof.

The only thing I can guess is that maybe it has to do with the massive quantity of vector allocations and accessing that gets done in each thread. I'm not using any other memory management libraries if that's relevant.

A super easy way to relieve TLB pressure is to use huge pages (presumably your hardware supports it). On linux you can use libhugetlbfs and its morecore hook.

HUGETLB_MORECORE=yes LD_PRELOAD=libhugetlbfs.so  ./brute_force_optimization
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there's quite a bit to the algorithm. basically I have a vector <vector <float> > that defines n sets of weights. At each iteration I allocate a second, temporary vector <vector <float> to hold n sets of weighted sums of inputs, which are calculated each iteration using the weights in the first vector. This happens 150K times per seconds (at bottleneck), spread accross m threads. There are also a few secondary algorithms that stochastically alter the weights, etc. I'm about to try your suggestions above. – Matt Munson Nov 25 '11 at 4:22
    
Ok, for the huge tlb experiment: don't forget to allocate some huge pages and create a hugetlbfs mount. See also: hugectl(8) and howto. – Brian Cain Nov 25 '11 at 4:30
    
How technical will it be to allocate the huge pages and create a hugetlbfs mount? I've looked at both links and it appears fairly involved. I'm pretty new to Linux. – Matt Munson Nov 25 '11 at 4:45
    
Any chance you would be willing to walk me through this? Also, I thought I should mention that my program uses less than 10mb of ram. So in that case is it likely that TLB is the issue? – Matt Munson Nov 25 '11 at 5:04
    
10MB worth of data in the weights and their sums? No, TLB pressure is likely not a dominant factor. Cache locality might be though. – Brian Cain Nov 25 '11 at 21:10

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