Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

In PHP, I'm trying to reference a method defined in an object's parent class, from a method inherited from the object's parent class. Here's the code:

class base_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "base_class::do_something()\n";
  }
  function inherit_this() {
    parent::do_something();
  }
}
class middle_class extends base_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "middle_class::do_something()\n";
  }
}
class top_class extends middle_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "top_class::do_something()\n";
    $this->inherit_this();
  }
}

$obj = new top_class;
$obj->do_something();

The problem is that parent::do_something() in inherit_this() tries to find the parent class of base_class, not the parent of the object's actual class, and the example above throws an error. Is there something I can write instead of parent::do_something() that would call middle_class::do_something(), and that would still work even in classes that extend (say) top_class?

share|improve this question
    
Can you not use php5 and then make a method that is private for base_class? This would mean that inheriting classes could not override the method. –  smack0007 Nov 25 '11 at 6:30
    
Perhaps, but I actually want the interiting class to override the method. It's actually most of the point of the original code. I may need to rewrite the example, but it'll be longer. –  Rick Koshi Nov 25 '11 at 6:56
add comment

4 Answers

To get it work you can modify your base_class like this:

class base_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "base_class::do_something()\n";
  }

 function inherit_this() {
    $this->do_something();
 }
}

Then your top_clas will call inherit_this() of your base class, but there will be a recursion: do_something() of top_class calls $this->inherit_this(), and in base_class you call again $this->do_something() (in your base class $this will reference to your top_class). Because of that, you will call inherit_this() over and over again.

You should rename the methods to prevent that.

Update

If you want that base_class inherit_this() prints "base_class::do_something" you could modify your base_class like this:

class base_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "base_class::do_something()\n";
  }

  function inherit_this() {
     base_class::do_something();
  }

}

In this case you make a static call to the base_class method do_something(). The output is top_class::do_something() base_class::do_something()

Update 2

Regarding to your comment you can modify your base_class like this:

class base_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "base_class::do_something()\n";
  }
  function inherit_this() {    
    $par = get_parent_class($this);
    $par::do_something();
  }
}

You get the parrent class of $this and then call the method. Output will be: top_class::do_something() middle_class::do_something()

share|improve this answer
1  
What I want is to have it call middle_class::do_something(), because the real code manipulates data in different ways for each level of the hierarchy, and I want to traverse the hierarchy all the way to the base without re-implementing inherit_this() at every level. –  Rick Koshi Nov 25 '11 at 6:52
    
@RickKoshi Ah OK! I will update –  Grrbrr404 Nov 25 '11 at 7:08
    
This does seem to work, but I can't shake the feeling that it might introduce some hard-to-find bug later, since it actually calls middle_class::do_something() as a static method, not a method on $this. $this remains set anyway only because of PHP's odd scoping. I haven't thought of an example it will break yet, but I'm nervous. I think perhaps call_user_func(array($this, get_parent_class($this) . "::do_something")) might be better, but I don't get a good feeling there either. –  Rick Koshi Nov 25 '11 at 7:37
    
Hm yeah, OOP in php is a bit odd in general... For your debug purposes you could maybe implement a special debug flag into your classes and work with some "magic constants". With them it is usually easy to find out whats going on. Check this page for further information: davidwalsh.name/php-magic-constants –  Grrbrr404 Nov 25 '11 at 7:52
    
On further reflection, I realized this method doesn't work for the case where inherit_this() is called by a method defined by an ancestor class of top_class. For example, if it were called by middle_class::do_something(), it would result in an infinite loop. I did, however, devise a solution involving debug_backtrace() (yuck) which seems to work. I wrote up the details and a longer example in a separate answer. –  Rick Koshi Nov 26 '11 at 22:49
add comment
up vote 1 down vote accepted

I'll start by saying "Thank you" to grrbrr404. He gave me some ideas and got me started in the right direction.

The solution I finally settled on was the following:

function inherit_this() {
  $bt = debug_backtrace();
  call_user_func(array($this, get_parent_class($bt[1]['class']) . '::do_something'));
}

It's not pretty (I particularly hate calling debug_backtrace() for this), but it keeps the object context set to $this, and handles the case where the method is called from a method somewhere in the middle of the object hierarchy.

For those who found my example confusing and/or wanted to know "Why would you want to do this?" I apologize, and provide the following additional example, which is hopefully more illustrative and closer to the original problem. It is considerably longer, but hopefully shows why I care about keeping $this set properly, and also shows why I can't hard-code any particular class name or use $this->method(). Avoiding infinite loops is always a priority with me. :-)

class class1_required_type { }
class class2_required_type { }
class class3_required_type { }
class class4_required_type { }

class class1 {
  protected $data = array();
  protected function checkType($name, $value, $requiredType) {
    print "In class1::checkType()\n";
    if (get_class($value) === $requiredType) {
      $backtrace = debug_backtrace();
      call_user_func(array($this, get_parent_class($backtrace[1]['class']) . "::mySet"), $name, $value);
    } else {
      throw new Exception(get_class($this) . "::mySet('" . $name . "') requires an object of type '" . $requiredType . "', but got '" . get_class($value) . "'");
    }
  }
  function mySet($name, $value) {
    print "In class1::mySet()\n";
    if ($name === 'class1_field') {
      $this->checkType($name, $value, 'class1_required_type');
    } else {
      $this->data[$name] = $value;
    }
  }
  function dump() {
    foreach ($this->data as $key => $value) {
      print "$key: " . get_class($value) . "\n";
    }
  }
}

class class2 extends class1 {
  function mySet($name, $value) {
    print "In class2::mySet()\n";
    if ($name === 'class2_field') {
      $this->checkType($name, $value, 'class2_required_type');
    } else {
      parent::mySet($name, $value);
    }
  }
}

class class3 extends class2 {
  function mySet($name, $value) {
    print "In class3::mySet()\n";
    if ($name === 'class3_field') {
      $this->checkType($name, $value, 'class3_required_type');
    } else {
      parent::mySet($name, $value);
    }
  }
}

class class4 extends class3 {
  function mySet($name, $value) {
    print "In class4::mySet()\n";
    if ($name === 'class4_field') {
      $this->checkType($name, $value, 'class4_required_type');
    } else {
      parent::mySet($name, $value);
    }
  }
}

$obj = new class4;
$obj->mySet('class3_field', new class3_required_type);
$obj->dump();

I'm trying to avoid duplication of the "checkType()" function, yet still provide correct behavior even when the hierarchy gets arbitrarily large.

More elegant solutions are, of course, most welcome.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Im not quite sure I understands why you want to do like this. But I guess you cannot do it. I understand that you will be able to make a middle_class2 and be able inherit from that, and then it would be middle_class2 instead of middle_class's dosomething you call?!

So I guess you'll need to create the

  function inherit_this() {
    parent::do_something();
  }

in the middle_class.

I thought about a get_class($this)::parent::do_something().. but that didn't work.

Just to be sure.. You want to call middle_class::do_something() right??

share|improve this answer
    
Correct, with full access to the properties and methods of $this –  Rick Koshi Nov 25 '11 at 7:47
add comment
class base_class {
  function do_something() {
    print "base_class::do_something()\n";
  }
  function inherit_this() {
   //parent::do_something();
     $class = get_called_class();
     $class::do_something();
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
An explanation of why this works would be great! –  PearsonArtPhoto Mar 3 at 20:00
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.