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I store a jquery object (a collection of html elements) but when I come to reference the object in another function it comes back as 'undefined'! Here's my code:

this.container = $('#slide-menu'), // The menu container (e.g. a UL)
this.items = this.container.find('.menu-item'); // The menu items (e.g. all li's)
this.links = this.items.find('.link'); // The menu links

this.getCurrent(); // Set the current menu-item
this.getPrev(); // Set the previous menu-item
this.getNext(); // Set the next menu-item

console.log(this.items); // !!! The items exist here !!!

// Setup the menu items click events:
this.items.bind('click', function(e) {

    console.log(this.items); // !!! But not here !!! ???

    e.preventDefault();
    o = $(e.currentTarget); // Set jquery object

    if (!o.hasClass('active')) { // Prevent action on current menu-item
        this.items.find('.active').removeClass('active'); // Remove the current active menu-item
        o.addClass('active'); // Set new active menu item

Does anyone have any idea why this is happening because it's driving me crazy and as far as I can see this should not be possible. Is javascript is broken?! Hmmm, what do you think?

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2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

When is an jquery object not an object?

Never.

When it's undefined!

Or when it's not where you think it is.

Does anyone have any idea why this is happening because it's driving me crazy and as far as I can see this should not be possible. Is javascript is broken?! Hmmm, what do you think?

No, Javascript is not "broken".

You've assumed this.items always refers to the same thing. It does not. Inside your bind, this is the thing that was clicked on, rather than whatever it is outside of that callback function.

Inside your callback, you ought to write $('#slide-menu').find('menu-item') rather than this.items.

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Doh! Yeah you're absolutely right, rookie mistake sorry. Thanks so much!! –  Chris Nov 25 '11 at 10:20
    
lol - is javascript broken? > jk. Thanks again, works now! –  Chris Nov 25 '11 at 10:31

It's a scope problem.

this outside of your click event handler is not the same as this inside the handler. Inside the handler it refers to the element being clicked. Outside it is likely the global window object.

This should work fine:

var items = this.container.find('.menu-item');

items.bind('click', function(e) {
     console.log(items); 

Don't use this in JavaScript unless you actually need to.

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I don't like the look of that circular dependency. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 25 '11 at 10:22
    
@TomalakGeret'kal circular dependency? –  Richard Dalton Nov 25 '11 at 10:26
    
A function referenced in the DOM is bound to a variable in Javascript. And your Javascript has a reference to the function. I think? I'd not reference items from inside the function, but re-obtain it within the callback. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 25 '11 at 10:30
    
It depends whether the list of elements in items is likely to change. If not then surely it's a good idea to cache the result rather than process the selector every time the click event fires? –  Richard Dalton Nov 25 '11 at 10:37
1  
@RichardD: I'd always rather avoid memory leaks in the first instance, and perform "optimisations" later. –  Lightness Races in Orbit Nov 25 '11 at 10:40

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