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I have following classses

Hello.java

package speak.hello;

import java.util.Map;

import speak.hi.CustomMap;
import speak.hi.Hi;

public class Hello {

    private Hi hi;

    Hello(Hi hi) {
        this.hi = hi;
    }

    public String sayHello() {
        return "Hello";
    }

    public String sayHi() {
        return hi.sayHi();
    }

    public Map<String, Object> getMap() {
        return hi.getMap();
    }

    public void clearMap() {
        hi.getMap().clear();
    }

    public void discardMap() {
        CustomMap map = (CustomMap) hi.getMap();
        map.discard();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Hello hello = new Hello(new Hi());
        System.out.println(hello.sayHello());
        System.out.println(hello.sayHi());
        System.out.println(hello.getMap());
        hello.clearMap();
        System.out.println("--");
        hello.discardMap();
    }

}

Hi.java

package speak.hi;

import java.util.HashMap;
import java.util.Map;

public class Hi {
    public String sayHi() {
        return "Hi";
    }

    public Map<String, Object> getMap() {
        return new CustomMap<String, Object>();
    }
}

CustomMap.java

package speak.hi;

import java.util.HashMap;

public class CustomMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = -7979398843650044928L;

    public void discard() {
        System.out.println("Discarding Map");
        this.clearCache();
        this.clear();
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        System.out.println("Clearing Map");
        super.clear();
    }

    private void clearCache() {
        System.out.println("Clearing Map");
    }
}

This works fine until I remove public access specifier from CustomMap

package speak.hi;

import java.util.HashMap;

class CustomMap<K, V> extends HashMap<K, V> {
    private static final long serialVersionUID = -7979398843650044928L;

    public void discard() {
        System.out.println("Discarding Map");
        this.clearCache();
        this.clear();
    }

    @Override
    public void clear() {
        System.out.println("Clearing Map");
        super.clear();
    }

    private void clearCache() {
        System.out.println("Clearing Map");
    }
}

Compiler yells that

The type speak.hi.CustomMap is not visible

Now If I don't have options to modify speak.hi.CustomMap (third party jar etc..) Is there any way I could still use CustomMap from speak.hello.Hello?


One option that I know is to move speak.hello.Hello to speak.hi.Hello as Now Hello is in package speak.hi it can access package private Class Hi


Is there any other way to do this ? Using reflection perhaps ?


EDIT :Updated with additional details as requested by @StephenC

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9 Answers 9

Is there any other way to do this ? Using reflection perhaps ?

Yes. Reflection can be used to bypass the Java access rules, if your application has full privilege.

For instance, to access a private field of an object from a different class, you need to:

  • Get the object's Class object.
  • Use the Class.getDeclaredField(...) method to get a Field object for the field.
  • Call Field.setAccessible(true) to turn off the access check.
  • Call Class.getField(object, Field) to get the field's value (or boxed value if it is a primitive type).

If the class itself is not accessible, you need to make sure that you don't refer to the classes identifier in your source code ... 'cos that will result in a compilation error. Instead, assign its reference to (say) variable of type Object or of some other visible supertype, and perform more specific operations on the instance reflectively.


As you might imagine, this is tedious and error prone. You'd be advised to find a better way, like:

  • getting the suppliers of the classes to fix whatever is causing you to need to break the visibility restrictions,
  • getting the suppliers of the classes to change their visibility,
  • finding another way to use the classes that doesn't require breaking open their abstraction, or
  • ditching them and finding (or writing) something better.

(Generally speaking, if you have to break open an abstraction then something is wrong with either the abstraction itself or the way you are using it.)


Finally, I should add that untrusted code is (should be) run in a security sandbox that blocks the use of the key reflective operations.

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1  
This definitely works when one wants to access non public fields of a Public Class. But doesn't work when you want to invoke a package private Class's method /Field from different package –  Prashant Bhate Nov 25 '11 at 11:19
    
@PrashantBhate - it should work. If it doesn't, show me the code and I'll see what the problem is. (If it is a compilation error, then the chances are that you've made the mistake of using identifier for the non-visible class in your code.) –  Stephen C Nov 25 '11 at 11:52
    
updated source code as you requested, Please suggest what Could be done –  Prashant Bhate Nov 25 '11 at 12:41
    
@PrashantBhate - My answer is about using reflection to solve the problem. I thought you were saying that you'd tried that approach, but there is no sign in any of your code that you have. So, my suggestion is to use reflection. Please read my answer for details. –  Stephen C Dec 21 '11 at 11:57
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Following method Invokes default scoped class method using reflection

public void discardMap() {
    //CustomMap map = (CustomMap) hi.getMap();
    //map.discard();
    try {
        Object o =hi.getClass().getMethod("getMap").invoke(hi);
        Method m = o.getClass().getMethod("discard");
        m.setAccessible(true);
        m.invoke(o);
    } catch (Exception e) {
        // TODO Auto-generated catch block
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
}
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This is dangerous advice. Fix the access modifier in the class. –  ChrisOdney Jul 1 at 16:04

Not possible. The security model is this : a model to provide security :) If you designed class Hi and delivered it to customers with private access, you wouldn't like them to be able to bypass your restrictions, would you?

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In general No , But you know Frameworks are designed by humans, and humans make mistake ! so when I need to use such framework I am forced to find a hack :) –  Prashant Bhate Nov 25 '11 at 11:01
    
The Java access modifiers are NOT primarily about security. They are about maintaining abstraction boundaries. (Hint: if you know what you are doing, you can use reflection to look at and change things that the access rules say you can't.) –  Stephen C Nov 25 '11 at 11:03
    
@StephenC Yes I know about setAccessible(true) But This doesn't seems to work with Class in the discussion :) –  Prashant Bhate Nov 25 '11 at 11:05
    
@PrashantBhate - that's probably because you are not doing it right. Show us the code. –  Stephen C Nov 25 '11 at 11:50
    
@StephenC See the code :) –  Prashant Bhate Dec 21 '11 at 10:45

Adding this solution for sake of completeness.

One option that I know is to move speak.hello.Hello to speak.hi.Hello as Now Hello is in package speak.hi it can access package private Class Hi

package speak.hi;

public class Hello {

    private Hi hi;

    Hello(Hi hi) {
        this.hi = hi;
    }

    public String sayHello() {
        return "Hello";
    }

    public String sayHi() {
        return hi.sayHi();
    }

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        Hello hello = new Hello(new Hi());
        System.out.println(hello.sayHello());
        System.out.println(hello.sayHi());
    }

}
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It may not be possible because:

--------Situation-------||--------public-----||-------------protected------------||----default-----||-----private------||
Accessible to class
from same package?---------------yes-----------------------yes-------------------------yes------------------no---------
Accessible to class
from different package?----------yes------------no, unless it is a subclass------------no-------------------no---------
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can you please make it readable? –  Prashant Bhate Nov 25 '11 at 11:09

Not Possible you can not create your Hi class as private.

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there are no private classes in java. if you try to make a class Private, it will give you compile time error "modifier private not allowed here" –  GPRathour Nov 25 '11 at 10:54
    
Thanks. I know that. –  Jwalin Shah Nov 25 '11 at 10:55
    
That's only true for top-level classes. –  Puce Nov 25 '11 at 10:57

I don't recommend to use non-API classes as they might change in any future version and can break your code.

How did you find out about this class? Is it an Open Source library?

Try to contact the authors of the library, tell them your use case and find a way with them to offer a public API. If it's an open source library you could help them by providing a patch.

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I think by default the class will be "default" (package private, you can say), NOT "private". So it can be accessed with in the same package.

Moreover, you CANNOT make any *top level class Private in Java.

And if you want make a class default and still be able to access it in other package then what will be the purpose of having access specifiers (modifiers) ??

you either need to make class public or move to the same package.

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1  
-1: the default is "package private" and you can declare private (nested) classes. –  Puce Nov 25 '11 at 10:56
    
but i think, here we are not talking about private (nested) classes. –  GPRathour Nov 25 '11 at 10:57
    
Your statement says: "any class private in Java" –  Puce Nov 25 '11 at 11:00
    
i already edited it @Mr. Puce. –  GPRathour Nov 25 '11 at 11:01
    
Just to confirm I meant "package private" = "default" top level Class. –  Prashant Bhate Nov 25 '11 at 11:03

I would think that if the authors of a library did not make a particular class part of the public API, it is because they don't want other people using it. You should respect the decision even though you can break it using reflection. Using private API is simply bad programming.

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