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I want to copy lines from one file to another:

count=1
while read -r i
do    
    echo $i
    (( count++ ))
done < "file1" > file2

but I don't get any leading spaces in lines in file 2 if they were in file1.

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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is because the value of IFS (internal field separator) will strip out those spaces. By default it separates based on spaces and newlines, I believe. A way around this is to temporarily set IFS equal to a newline.

#!/bin/bash

IFS="
"

count=1

while read -r i || [[ -n "$i" ]]
do
    echo $i 
    (( count++ ))
done < "file1" > file2

unset IFS
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Thanks! One more question: in this loop if last string with text in original file is not followed by line break that is not copied to file2. What can I do about that? –  WHITECOLOR Nov 25 '11 at 14:03
    
I have edited my answer to account for that. The value will have been read into the variable, but the while will exit. This fixes that. –  Buggabill Nov 25 '11 at 14:12
    
Thank you very much =) –  WHITECOLOR Nov 25 '11 at 14:46
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Here's another approach:

sed -n p < file1 > file2 ; count=$(wc -l file2)
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Thanks I've got to copy not all strings –  WHITECOLOR Nov 25 '11 at 14:01
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You can use the line command:

count=1
while i=$(line)
do    
    echo "$i"
    (( count++ ))
done < "file1" > file2

However, this is significantly slower than read, because read is a bash builtin and line is a executable.

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Thank you. But, the only thing that I'm not on nix, but on windows. =) –  WHITECOLOR Nov 25 '11 at 14:45
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