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Consider the following code that takes the function f(), copies the function itself in its entirety to a buffer, modifies its code and runs the altered function. In practice, the original function that returns number 22 is cloned and modified to return number 42.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include <string.h>

#define ENOUGH 1000
#define MAGICNUMBER 22
#define OTHERMAGICNUMBER 42

int f(void)
{
    return MAGICNUMBER;
}

int main(void)
{
    int i,k;
    char buffer[ENOUGH];
    /* Pointer to original function f */
    int (*srcfptr)(void) = f;
    /* Pointer to hold the manipulated function */
    int (*dstfptr)(void) = (void*)buffer;
    char* byte;
    memcpy(dstfptr, srcfptr, ENOUGH);
    /* Replace magic number inside the function with another */
    for (i=0; i < ENOUGH; i++) {
        byte = ((char*)dstfptr)+i;
        if (*byte == MAGICNUMBER) {
            *byte = OTHERMAGICNUMBER;
        }
    }

    k = dstfptr();
    /* Prints the other magic number */
    printf("Hello %d!\n", k);
    return 0;
}

The code now relies on just guessing that the function will fit in the 1000 byte buffer. It also violates rules by copying too much to the buffer, since the function f() will be most likely a lot shorter than 1000 bytes.

This brings us to the question: Is there a method to figure out the size of any given function in C? Some methods include looking into intermediate linker output, and guessing based on the instructions in the function, but that's just not quite enough. Is there any way to be sure?


Please note: It compiles and works on my system but doesn't quite adhere to standards because conversions between function pointers and void* aren't exactly allowed:

$ gcc -Wall -ansi -pedantic fptr.c -o fptr
fptr.c: In function 'main':
fptr.c:21: warning: ISO C forbids initialization between function pointer and 'void *'
fptr.c:23: warning: ISO C forbids passing argument 1 of 'memcpy' between function pointer and 'void *'
/usr/include/string.h:44: note: expected 'void * __restrict__' but argument is of type 'int (*)(void)'
fptr.c:23: warning: ISO C forbids passing argument 2 of 'memcpy' between function pointer and 'void *'
/usr/include/string.h:44: note: expected 'const void * __restrict__' but argument is of type 'int (*)(void)'
fptr.c:26: warning: ISO C forbids conversion of function pointer to object pointer type
$ ./fptr
Hello 42!
$

Please note: on some systems executing from writable memory is not possible and this code will crash. It has been tested with gcc 4.4.4 on Linux running on x86_64 architecture.

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No code that attempts anything like this can even remotely adhere to standards. There's no guarantee even that a function occupies contiguous space in memory. There's certainly no guarantee that the byte MAGICNUMBER won't appear in the function's code not representing the return value, but because it just so happens to be part of some opcode. –  Steve Jessop Nov 25 '11 at 14:30
    
There is no requirement that the code for a function be contiguous. There is also no requirement that the compiler generate position-independent code. (Most don't.) –  Raymond Chen Nov 25 '11 at 14:30
    
Or that the operating system will allow you to execute code that is on the stack. –  JeremyP Nov 25 '11 at 14:46
    
Machines with Harvard Architecture won't let you easily convert function pointers to data pointers or the other way around and read/modify code directly in C. –  Alexey Frunze Nov 25 '11 at 14:53
    
Harvard Architecture is rather obsolete and is rather a curiosity for language lawyers. The other issues are all completely relevant, though. –  R.. Nov 25 '11 at 15:16
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5 Answers

up vote 2 down vote accepted

You cannot do this in C. Even if you knew the length, the address of a function matters, because function calls and accesses to certain types of data will use program-counter-relative addressing. Thus, a copy of the function located at a different address will not do the same thing as the original. Of course there are many other issues too.

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if hes on x64, he can emit PIC, which will solve one half of the problems –  Necrolis Nov 25 '11 at 14:55
2  
No, it won't solve the problems; PIC actually makes it worse. Non-PIC code will merely hard-code the absolute address of data it accesses, making it safe to run the code at a different address as long as it makes no function calls, but PIC code will code the relative address of the data (or of the GOT), which will be different if the function moves. PIC only works when the entire DSO is relocated together, with no internal relative addresses changing. It does not work on a single-function level. –  R.. Nov 25 '11 at 15:12
    
this is the definition I'm using: "Position-independent code can be copied to any memory location and executed without modification" ( en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Position-independent_code ) –  Necrolis Nov 25 '11 at 16:15
    
Well that definition does not match the actual real-world use of it (e.g. -fPIC in gcc) unless you interpret "code" as the entire DSO. –  R.. Nov 26 '11 at 5:40
    
It depends on what you expect to happen to external references. One interpretation would be that the moved code would relocate with moved external references. (e.g., if you move a function that accesses a variable, then the moved function assumes the variable has also moved.) Another is that the moved code would relocate with shared external references. (A moved function accesses the original variable.) The definition you're using is ambiguous with respect to externals, and most people use the first interpretation (moved externals), since that interpretation is more useful. –  Raymond Chen Nov 26 '11 at 15:43
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In the C standard, there is no notion of introspection or reflection, thus you'd need to devise a method yourself, as you have done, some other safer methods exists however.

There are two ways:

  1. Disassemble the function (at runtime) till you hit the final RETN/JMP/etc, while accounting for switch/jump tables. This of course requires some heavy analysis of the function you disassemble (using an engine like beaEngine), this is of course the most reliable, but its slow and heavy.
  2. Abuse compilation units, this is very risky, and not fool proof, but if you know you compiler generates functions sequentially in their compilation unit, you can do something along these lines:

    void MyFunc()
    {
        //...
    }
    
    void MyFuncSentinel()
    {
    }
    
    //somewhere in code
    size_t z = (uintptr_t)MyFuncSentinel - (uintptr_t)MyFunc;
    uint8_t* buf = (uint8_t*)malloc(z);
    memcpy(buf,(char*)MyFunc,z);
    

    this will have some extra padding, but it will be minimal (and unreachable). although highly risky, its a lot faster that the disassemble method.

note: both methods will require that the target code has read permissions.


@R.. raises a very good point, your code won't be relocatable unless its PIC or you reassasmble it in-place to adjust the addresses etc.

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Here is a standards compliant way of achieving the result you want:

int f(int magicNumber)
{
    return magicNumber;
}

int main(void)
{

    k = f(OTHERMAGICNUMBER);
    /* Prints the other magic number */
    printf("Hello %d!\n", k);
    return 0;
}

Now, you may have lots of uses of f() all over the place with no arguments and not want to go through your code changing every one, so you could do this instead

int f()
{
    return newf(MAGICNUMBER);
}

int newf(int magicNumber)
{
    return magicNumber;
}


int main(void)
{

    k = newf(OTHERMAGICNUMBER);
    /* Prints the other magic number */
    printf("Hello %d!\n", k);
    return 0;
}

I'm not suggesting this is a direct answer to your problem but that what you are doing is so horrible, you need to rethink your design.

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Well, you can obtain the length of a function at runtime using labels:

int f()
{
    int length;
    start:
    length = &&end - &&start + 11; // 11 is the length of function prologue
                                   // and epilogue, got with gdb

    printf("Magic number: %d\n", MagicNumber);

    end:
    return length;
}

After executing this function we know its length, so we can malloc for the right length, copy and editing the code, then executing it.

int main()
{
    int (*pointerToF)(), (*newFunc)(), length, i;
    char *buffer, *byte;

    length = f();

    buffer = malloc(length);
    if(!buffer) {
        printf("can't malloc\n");
        return 0;
    }

    pointerToF = f;
    newFunc = (void*)buffer;
    memcpy(newFunc, pointerToF, length);

    for (i=0; i < length; i++) {
        byte = ((char*)newFunc)+i;
        if (*byte == MagicNumber) {
            *byte = CrackedNumber;
        }
    }

    newFunc();
}

Now there's another bigger problem though, the one @R. mentioned. Using this function once modified (correctly) results in segmentation fault when calling printf because the call instruction has to specify an offset which will be wrong. You can see this with gdb, using disassemble f to see the original code and x/15i buffer to see the edited one.
By the way, both my code and yours compile without warnings but crash on my machine (gcc 4.4.3) when calling the edited function.

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1  
Depending on compiler optimizations, you may discover that end comes before start. –  Raymond Chen Nov 26 '11 at 15:49
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Check this out.
http://haxordotnet.blogspot.com/2011/11/dynamically-write-function-and-execute.html

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2  
-1: It stops exactly where this question starts. –  Jan Hudec Nov 25 '11 at 13:32
    
Yes indeed. That example code makes just yet another guess by copying the fist 100 bytes from the start of the function and assuming it works. –  Otto Harju Nov 25 '11 at 13:42
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